Home / Gear Reviews / Emberlit FireAnt Ultralight Titanium Wood Stove

Emberlit FireAnt Ultralight Titanium Wood Stove

made by :
Philip Werner
Version:
1
Price:
69.99

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On May 18, 2015
Last modified:August 2, 2015

Summary:

The Emberlit FireAnt Titanium Wood Stove is a collapsible wood stove that folds flat for easy carriage in your backpack. Weighing just 2.8 ounces, it can be used to burn small pieces of wood so you don't have to carry fuel when you go backpacking. It also comes with an optional shelf for holding solid fuel tablets, such as Esbit cubes, and positions them at an optimal height for efficient boiling.

Emberlit FireAnt Titanium Wood Stove
Emberlit FireAnt Titanium Wood Stove

The Emberlit FireAnt Titanium Wood Stove is a collapsible wood stove that folds flat for easy carriage in your backpack. Weighing just 2.8 ounces, it can be used to burn small pieces of wood  so you don’t have to carry fuel when you go backpacking. It also comes with an optional shelf for holding solid fuel tablets, such as Esbit cubes, and positions them at an optimal height for efficient boiling.

Collapsible Wood Stove

I’m a huge fan of collapsible wood stoves because they take so little volume to store in a backpack. Un-assembled, the FireAnt folds completely flat and can easily be stored in an external pack pocket which is nice if you want to avoid stinking up the rest of your gear with wood smoke. This stove is so small – the long panels are only 5″ high – that you can store the entire disassembled stove flat in a ziplock sandwich bag!

The Emberlit FireAnt Wood Stove is collapsible and can be stored flat in your backpack.
The Emberlit FireAnt Wood Stove is collapsible and can be stored flat in your backpack.

Assembly is very easy: simply slot the panels together and slide in the stove base to prevent your wood from burning the ground beneath the stove. There’s no need to insert cross bars or use tent stakes to keep your pot from falling into the stove, unlike the original larger version of the Emberlit which is heavier and has a larger fire-box.

Fire Door

I’ve found that a stove’s worth of wood (two handfuls) is usually enough to boil two cups of water. If you need to add more, you can lift your pot and drop more in from top or feed it into the side fire door. This is a large opening in one of the FireAnt’s side panels that lets you slide bigger pieces of wood into the fire-box, especially ones you’re unable to break by hand. As these large pieces of wood burn down, you can keep pushing them into the firebox to provide your fire with more fuel. Alternatively, you pull them out when you want to reduce the heat put out by the stove for simmering.

No Wind Screen Necessary

One of the nice things about most wood stoves it that you don’t need to pack a pot stand or wind screen, because the stove fulfills both of those functions. Wide pots or narrow, the FireAnt can support them all, although I’d be careful about putting a very heavy 3+ liter pot full of water on top of it if it’s not sitting on a level surface.

The EmberLit FireAnt is susceptible to a strong breeze. Be sure to position the stove behind a boulder if its windy to keep the flame and heat centered on your pot.
The EmberLit FireAnt is susceptible to a strong breeze. Be sure to position the stove behind a boulder if it’s windy to keep the flame and heat centered on your pot.

One caveat. While the FireAnt’s air ports and fire door provide ample oxygen for your fire, they can also channel a lot of the fire away from your pot if you stove the set up in a brisk wind. If it’s windy out, set up the stove behind a big rock or wind break in order to keep the flame and heat centered on your camping pot.

The Emberlit FireAnt Wood Stove comes with a small shelf that you can use to burn solid fuel tablets, like Esbit.
The Emberlit FireAnt Wood Stove comes with a small shelf that you can use to burn solid fuel tablets, like Esbit.

Using Fuel Cubes

I always pack a few solid fuel cubes in my fire-making kit when I carry a wood stove on trips, in case it rains, and I can’t find any dry wood. When using solid fuel, you want to position it closer to the bottom of the pot using the optional solid fuel shelf insert that comes with the FireAnt. If you lose this shelf, you can also just fill the FireAnt with small rocks up to the same height as the shelf to get the fuel cube into the proper position. I know from experience!

Conclusion

The Emberlit FireAnt is a great little titanium ultralight stove ideally suited for cooking simple one pot backpacking meals that require boiled water or a little simmering. Weighing just 2.8 ounces, it’s very nicely made, easy to assemble, and fully collapsible, making it very easy to carry in a backpack. If you’re going to buy a small wood stove for individual use, the FireAnt is an excellent choice.

Disclosure: Emberlit provided Philip Werner (SectionHiker.com) with a sample FireAnt Stove for this review. 

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11 comments

  1. That looks very nice but expensive . Is it what u used on the AT this year? I’m going back the end of May for another 300 miles . That stove would work out well.

    Thom

  2. I will be on a 100 miler this summer and am taking my emberlight. How many fuel tablets do you usually bring? I will be out 10 days or so.

  3. Here is my issue with these type of Stoves and Campfires in General…Three times in my life I have been on the Roof of my home in San Diego County and have had a Wall of Flames within a quarter mile devouring homes at a rapid rate on three sides of me,,all due to People cooking with Fire..I heard announcements from a Sheriff’s Copter twice to get out an off the trial due to Forest fire started by a Camp fire that has gotten away from a Camper…I see no reason to use a wood burning stove in the wild with the availability of canisters and White gas Stoves of which I have yet to have heard started a Forest Fire..

    • But those were probably all fire ring campfires…these little wood stoves are far more controlled.

    • I’ve had problems with my white gas stove that lead me to believe it’s more of a fire risk than any campfire.

      I always clean my stove after every trip, and have read and practiced the procedure for lighting the stove many times.

      However, several times when trying to prime the stove, a basketball size fireball resulted.

      Once, the valve didn’t fully shut off – which caused the fire ball to grow rather than shrink. I was forced to throw the stove because the fireball had covered the valve and I expected the stove to explode within the next few seconds. Fortunately, throwing the stove put out the fire.

      I don’t camp with a white gas stove anymore – except in winter conditions where canister stoves don’t work.

      In comparison, my alcohol stove seem extremely safe. I’ve had canister stoves “stick” open and had to wait until the gas ran out.

      I suppose you could knock over an alcohol stove and start a fire – if you didn’t notice it tipped over and just stomp out the fire ;)

      Same thing with a twig fire contained in a backpacking wood stove.

      I suspect forest fires caused by campers has nothing to do with the danger of campfire embers floating in the air – and everything to do with whether heavy drinking causes people to fall asleep and leave the fire unattended…

  4. James Richardson

    Check out the precision German “Bushbox Outdoor Pocket Stove,” of which this appears as a knockoff. Almost a twin but the better designed alternative to this one, IMO. Titanium version is excellent. You’ll only buy it once.

    • All of these box stoves are basically the same.

    • The fireant is nothing like a bushbox. The latter weighs twice as much, does not allow a trangia to be “clipped” into place and is larger when folded. It is a bit cheaper though. I am unsure why anyone would say the bushbox is a better design as they all burn in the same manner except perhaps those double-walled units that provide a secondary burn.

  5. James Richardson

    Yes they are. Buy one of each, compare over time, then when you inevitably lose a piece of one model, you can still hit the trail.

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