Home / Trip Reports / Hike Mt Chocorua

Hike Mt Chocorua

Rocky Summit of Mt Chocorua (3475')
Rocky Summit of Mt Chocorua (3475′)

Mt Chocorua is one of the most frequently photographed mountains in the world according to the Appalachian Mountain Club’s White Mountain Guide. Located near New Hampshire’s Mt Washington (6082′). Chocorua is far from being the highest mountain in the White Mountain National Forest only rising to an elevation of 3475′. But it’s a hiker’s mountain with many fine trails that climb up its summit ledges and  mesmerizing 360 degree views of the surrounding peaks, lakes, and valleys.

Champney Falls
Pitcher Falls on the Champney Falls Trail to Mt Chocorua

Two of the most popular trails that climb the mountain are the Champney Falls Trail, known for its jaw dropping waterfalls,  and the Piper Trail.

Rock-hoppable stream crossing at the beginning of the Champney Falls Trail
Rock-hoppable stream crossing at the beginning of the Champney Falls Trail

The Champney Falls Trail

Starting from the Kancamagus Highway. the Champney Falls Trail climbs the northeastern ridge of the mountain passing by famous Champney Falls and skirting a subsidiary peak named Middle Sister. Leaving the highway, the  trail passes over a small stream with a washed out bridge shortly after leaving the highway and proceeds south on moderate grades for 1.4 miles until it reaches the cutoff trail for the Pitcher and Champney Falls.

Champney Falls
Champney Falls

After passing the waterfall spur, the Champney Falls trail continues to climb up rock stairs. Like most White Mountain trails, the trail footing is rocky and covered with roots, so care should be taken.

Stone stairs after the waterfall spur - Champney Brook Trail
Stone stairs after the waterfall spur – Champney Falls Trail

At 3.0 miles, the Champney Falls Cut-off Trail splits off towards Middle Sister, one of Chocorua’s subsidiary sister peaks which is the site of an old fire tower. Exploring the Sisters is an excellent hike, but best left for a follow-up trip. At 3.2 miles, the Champney Falls Trail intersects the Piper Trail which travels 0.6 miles to the Chocorua summit. Note the location of this sign. You want to rejoin the Champney Falls Trail if descending the way you came. Descending from here via the Piper Trail is also a viable option, provided you drop a car at the Piper Trailhead off Rt 16, and one that will afford you with even more Chocorua views.

Intersection of Champney Brook Trail and Piper Trail, 0.6 miles to Chocorua Summit
Intersection of Champney Falls Trail and Piper Trail, 0.6 miles to Chocorua Summit

The Piper Trail

Continuing from the Champney and Piper Trail Junction, climb to the Mt Chocorua summit over open ledge. The Piper Trail is marked with yellow paint on the rock surface and may be hard to see in places, although the route is popular and you are likely to see many people climbing it on a weekend day.

Scrambling up the summit ledges of Mt Chocorua
Scrambling up the summit ledges of Mt Chocorua

Climbing up the ledges is moderately difficult and some scrambling is required near the northeastern crag just below the summit. If you are hiking with a dog, a leash is recommended to protect your pooch and to keep them  from interfering with other hikers over areas of precarious footing.

The top of Mt Chocorua is often crowded on weekends. Go during the week if you crave solitude.
The top of Mt Chocorua is often crowded on weekends. Go during the week if you crave solitude.

The Views from Mt Chocorua

If you crave open mountain views, few peaks in the White Mountains can compare with Mt Chocorua, even the 4000 footers. Located at the eastern end of the Sandwich Range, you can easily name 100 mountains from the top of Chocorua on a clear day, as far west as Mt Moosilauke and the Kinsmans along the westernmost border of the White Mountains and as far north as Mt Washington and the Southern Presidential Range. To the south and east, the eastern White Mountains are visible from Carter Notch, past Jackson and Conway, down to the  Lake District, and further east to the peaks in Maine.

he Northest Ridges, the Moats, and the eastern White Mountains
The Northeast Ridges, the Moats, and the eastern White Mountains
Northeast to Carrigan Notch
Northwest to Carrigan Notch
The view looking west from the Sandwich Range all the way to Moosilauke and the Kinsmans
The view looking west from the Sandwich Range all the way to Moosilauke and the Kinsmans
Looking Southeast to the Lake District from Mt Chocorua
Looking Southeast to the Lake District from Mt Chocorua

Descending via The Champney Falls Trail

To descend, retrace your steps back to the trail junction between the Champney Falls Trail and the Piper Trail. Descending the ledges can be a bit harder on the knees than climbing so go slow and avoid any rocky wet spots or areas covered with moss and lichen because they’re very slippery. Weaving back and forth can also relieve some  of the pressure on your knees rather than walking down the rocks in a straight line. Remember there is also no shame in butt sliding: it’s a well used technique, even by the most experienced mountaineers!

Scrambling down the northeast side below the Chocorua Summit
Scrambling down the northeast side below the Chocorua Summit

Descending via the Piper Trail

Alternatively, you can descend Mt Chocorua via the Piper Trail which has many fine views of the east side (the front) of Mt Chocorua and it’s plunging cliffs. However, this trail is much more difficult to descend than the Champney Falls trail because it runs along more steep open ledge towards Rt 16.

Sign near the end of the Piper Trail Head Parking Lot
Sign near the end of the Piper Trail Head Parking Lot

The distance between the top of Mt Chocorua and the Pipe Trail parking lot is 4.2 miles, but it’s a very nice walk down passing the Camp Penacook Lean-to and through a beautiful section of forest. If you choose this option, be sure to park a car at the trail head off Rt 16 or arrange for someone to pick you up when you finish your hike.

Cautions

Care should be taken when climbing the trails up Mt Chocorua because they pass over barren ledges of rock  which become can quite slippery when wet or covered with ice in winter. While low in elevation, Chocorua is also extremely exposed in the event of lightning storms. There are also few streams along the trails and it’s recommended that hikers carry 3 liters each on hot days to stay hydrated. Extra water should also be carried for dogs.

Recommended Guidebooks and Maps:

Most Popular Searches

  • Mt Chocorua Hiking Trails
  • mount chocorua hikes
  • chocorua hike

10 comments

  1. Chocorua was one of my first hikes in the whites and I remember being so intimidated in the parking lot, looking up at that fang of rock jutting out of the ridge. “How are you supposed to get up there?” I remembered thinking but reverted to the same logic used on roller coasters of watching other people doing it and assuming I would be fine, which works most of the time. Most.

    • It’s not the easiest hike, but certainly one of the most rewarding in the Whites with those views. It’s one of the few hikes I don’t mind repeating each year because it’s so exquisite, although I try to take different trails each time to keep the experience novel.

  2. Definitely on my list for the next trip up there.

  3. I was looking at attempting this via the Piper trail this winter, as a step stone up from Monadnock… Do-able with microspikes?

  4. I have wanted to hike the Appalachians very badly and these photos make me want to even more so. I love the photos of the waterfalls. Very nicely done and thanks for sharing!

    Those scenic views are amazing.

  5. Loved this hike! We didn’t have any solitude when we did it, but the views more than made up for it.

  6. I see Paul and Cliff in the pictures, must have been an AMC hike.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *