8 responses

  1. Martin Rye
    July 9, 2013

    I recall telling you how good and Lakes and Dales are and you seemed unsure. Now your a convert. Get back soon and we can show you the wild camp spots to die for. Sand Tarn on Wild Boar Fell and many more amazing places.

    • Philip Werner
      July 9, 2013

      I am a believer now! Lovely place and a must visit in my book.

  2. David Williams
    July 9, 2013

    What a lovely post, Philip, about a lovely area. The Lakes and Howgills are my home patch. Glad you enjoyed them and want to come back. Happy to show you more if you ever come back over.

    David

  3. robbob
    July 9, 2013

    Thanks for a very wonderful post. On one level I enjoyed it for the mood, the tone, and the lovely description. On another level, it also made me think about our American way of hiking, and how, all too often, we manage to turn recreation into work. We go on at length about how tough or extreme our hikes are: how far we walk or how fast we finish finish.

    From the sound of it, people in the British Isles seem more inclined to tarry and enjoy their surroundings. I like that! (Although I have to admit that there are notable American exceptions. I’m a great admirer of our own Steve Smith, who has mastered the art of joyful walking. He savors the simple pleasures to be found in almost any walk.)

    I’ve heard that John Muir, a Scot by birth, disliked the term “hiking” because it sounded too harsh, too extreme. He preferred the word “saunter.” I think I do, too.

    Thanks, again, for a delightful post.

    • Philip Werner
      July 9, 2013

      I’m glad you mentioned that – I’m also a big admirer of Steve and devour the trip reports on his blog http://mountainwandering.blogspot.com/.

      One reason I like off-trail hiking so much is that it encourages a much slower pace and less emphasis on the “big brag” speed of a thru-hike or the elevation gain of a peak-bagging experience. This was reinforced by my trip to the Howgills and the Lakes where I rediscovered the joy of hiking smaller hills, more slowly. Got me rethinking what I enjoy about hiking so much.

      You might also be interested in another local (New England) author/hiker, named Walt Mclaughlin who’s guest posted on Sectionhiker (as has Steve). Walt’s new book “The Allure of Deep Woods” is about stretching out an end-to-end hike of the NPT in the Dacks. I just finished it and it transported me to the calmness of sitting by lakes on summer days, fishing, and swimming along the way. Sauntering is a good word. I have friends who also like the word “bimble.” Cheers.

      • robbob
        July 9, 2013

        Thanks for the reminder about Walt Mclaughlin’s new book.

        And thanks again for doing such a fine job on your blog. Your posts always provide a pleasant way to begin a new day.

  4. Ed Danziger
    July 13, 2013

    I, too, enjoyed Phillip’s post, which took me back to my hikes on Wainwright’s Sea to Sea trail whose western end is anchored in the Lake District. Also, having been persuaded by Phillip’s earlier posts, I up and purchased a set of Pacerpoles! I start each day with a cup of coffee and a check on the Section Hiker website. It often transports me back to happy times on New England and UK trails. Keep up the great work, Phillip.

    • Philip Werner
      July 13, 2013

      Ed – Thank you for your comment. That made my day!

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