11 responses

  1. Rick
    December 19, 2013

    Thank you Phillip. Lots of good information here. For thoses working on their NE4k’s or 100 highest, I found these 2 sites also helpful.

    http://www.erh.noaa.gov/btv/mountain/point/

    http://www.maine.gov/mema/weather/weather.htm

    • Philip Werner
      December 19, 2013

      I’ve found the Maine Mema information very useful in summer for predicting lightining strikes above treeline and flash floods along the Maine AT where many of the NE4k’s are located (are we crazy or what?). The NOAA site has a ton of great info, but it can be really hard to find. Thanks for puling out that link.

  2. Jim
    December 19, 2013

    Phil, curious what you think of the site below…I have been using it for mt Rainier, and it has been quite good. Covers a very wide array of mountain ranges worldwide. Jim

    http://www.mountain-forecast.com/peaks/Bear-Mountain-New-Hampshire/forecasts/913

    • Philip Werner
      December 19, 2013

      Doesn’t work for me, here.

      I typed in a mountan called Bondcliff which is one of the most famous peaks in the White Mountains and it couldn’t find it. So I typed in the name of the adjacent peak, Mount Bond. I happen to have a pretty good idea what the weather is going to be on both over the next three days because I’ve been studying it intensely the past five in preparation for a 3.2 mile above treeline traverse over them. The forecast provided by this site doesn’t jibe with most of the local predictions or weather trends I have access to from the National Weather Service or my other local sources and does not disclose any of the models used to generate its forecasts. I’d much rather read a detailed summary -really detailed – from the National Weather Forecast that I know is done by a meterologist familiar with the area. I can read the guy’s personal interpretation of the facts online. It’s all in NOAA.

      Maybe weather forecasting is easy on Rainer. I dunno. I’m not wowed by that site. I’ve heard of other people using it, but I have to scratch my head and ask why. There is much better out there.

      • Chris G
        December 19, 2013

        Sorry to contradict you on this but I like mountain weather. It is by no means all inclusive but on the link above if you go to the right hand drop down you will see a list of peaks. Below is Mount Bond.
        http://www.mountain-forecast.com/peaks/Mount-Bond/forecasts/1432

        I like it because I can see the weather at different elevations and that provides some nice insight as to whats going on. I also find the data display visually appealing. My two go-tos are first NOAA then mountain weather.

      • Philip Werner
        December 19, 2013

        That’s fine, but their wind forecast on Mt Bond for this weekend is probably wrong. It’s 2X what is likely to occur and they don’t explain why. I don’t particularly find the data display very appealng and view it as borderline sophmoric, but to each is own. (I am married – people contradict me all the time)

      • Philip Werner
        December 19, 2013

        Try typing in Mount Hitchcock – they don’t have it. Seriously? How could you possibly predict what you’ll encounter off trail for your bushwhack using the Mountain-Forecast.com site?

  3. Milton
    December 20, 2013

    A great wind forecasting website which I use frequently is -

    http://www.usairnet.com/cgi-bin/launch/code.cgi?Submit=Go&sta=KMWN&state=NH

    Enjoy!

  4. Paul
    December 25, 2013

    Excellent article. I am recently retired from the national weather service and worked for years on the point forecasts. Since retired I have also created apps for both the Mac desktop and iPhone that use the point forecasts. The iPhone app is great in places where you have a cell connection you can get a forecast for that exact 5×5 km square area using the phones gps to accurately position yourself. More information on my apps is available at http://pinpointwx.com/

    • Philip Werner
      December 25, 2013

      How good are the point forecasts in the White Mountains? I am always a bit leery of them since the detailed forecast discussion is done by a metereologist in Portland, Maine which is some distance away.

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