Home / Gear Reviews / Sierra Designs Tensegrity 1 Ultralight Tent Review

Sierra Designs Tensegrity 1 Ultralight Tent Review

manufactured by:
Philip Werner
Version:
1
Price:
319.00

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On September 8, 2015
Last modified:September 10, 2015

Summary:

While the Tensegrity 1 FL tent incorporates a lot of innovative design concepts, it's comfortable to sleep in, well-ventilated, and will keep you dry in bad weather, it's not one of the tents that I'd recommend to someone who wants to lighten their gear weight by buying a 2 pound tent. While the Tensegrity 1 is not difficult to pitch with a little practice, I don't like the fact that it requires so much space to set up. That makes is virtually unusable on the backpacking trips I take in the eastern United States with dense forests and convoluted ground where there isn't enough open space to pitch a tent of this size. That's the type of environment where a small tarp and screened bivy sack are perfect for fitting into the narrow spaces between trees.

The screened walls in the Sierra Designs Tensegrity 1 FL tent provide excellent ventilation and airflow.
The screened walls in the Sierra Designs Tensegrity 1 FL tent provide excellent ventilation and airflow.

The Sierra Designs Tensegrity 1 FL (feather lite) is a lightweight trekking pole tent that provides the benefits of ultralight tarp camping with the comfort of a screened-in and rain-proof tent. A single walled shelter without a separate rain fly, (you can pitch it in the rain without getting the interior wet) the Tensegrity 1 FL provides ample headroom and interior volume for one person, including a large vestibule area to store gear. Weighing just 33 ounces (minus stakes), the Tensegrity 1 FL provides a good middle ground for backpackers who want the benefits of a tarp style shelter without having to learn how to pitch a tarp or tie a bunch of knots.

The interior of the Tensegrity 1 is quite large with ample space for your sleeping gear and plenty of room to move around.
The interior of the Tensegrity 1 is quite large with ample space for your sleeping gear and plenty of room to move around.

Interior Design

Despite having a relatively low profile, the interior volume of the Tensegrity 1 is quite large, providing lots of room for you to spread out inside without feeling claustrophobic. Shaped like a wedge, if has three mesh walls along the sides and head end of the tent. The tent roof is a sloped ceiling that drapes over the living compartment, while the foot end of the interior is suspended by a collapsible tent pole that runs through an exterior sleeve in the tent ceiling. The foot end also has a mesh window, which is covered with an exterior awning to prevent rain and splash-back from entering.

The foot end of the Tensegrity 1 still requires a hooped pole. This inserts into an exterior sleeve and creates a covered and screened window.
The foot end of the Tensegrity 1 still requires a hooped pole. This inserts into an exterior sleeve and creates a covered and screened window.

All of this ventilation is necessary because the Tensegrity 1 is a single wall tent, which is prone to internal condensation. In a double walled tent, internal condensation flows through the mesh walls of the inner tent and sticks on the inside of the rain fly, away from you and your gear so they stay dry. That’s not the case in a single-walled tent where the moisture collects on the surfaces that you and your gear brush up against. Good air flow helps mitigate internal condensation buildup however, helping to vent moisture and dry it faster. Of course, if you find yourself camping in very humid or misty conditions, no amount of ventilation will prevent internal condensation from adhering to the interior walls. That’s just the way it is.

If you are too cold and want to limit the amount of airflow through the Tensegrity, or simply want more privacy, the side mesh walls of the tent have solid inner panels that can be zippered closed over the mesh. The same can’t be said however of the mesh panels at the head and foot end of the tent which have no solid fabric panels covering them. They must always remain open, which can be a mixed bag, since it limits the extent which you can regulate airflow when the wind picks up or the temperature drops. You just need to be sensitive to this limitation in cooler weather and make sure that you bring a good hat and sufficient sleeping insulation with you if you chill easily.

The Tensegrity 1 has two doors, one on the side and one under the awning, where my pack is stored, above.
The Tensegrity 1 has two doors, one on the side and one under the awning, where my pack is stored, above.

In addition to ventilation, the front door at the head end of the tent is designed to give you access to the storage area formed under the front awning. While the awning can be rolled up so you can see out the front door in “star-gazing” mode, you need to set up additional guy lines, since the front awning holds the front wall up, to keep the front of the wedge from collapsing. And while you can technically enter and exit the tent through the front door, the side door makes a better entry because it’s larger and you don’t need to worry about dislodging your trekking poles when you get in and out of the tent.

Weatherproofing

Despite its ungainly appearance and mesh windows, the Tensegrity 1 will keep you high and dry in heavy thunderstorms. This was one of my chief concerns when testing this tent because there isn’t a solid fabric panel behind the front mesh window that you can close and because the side windows have very little tarp coverage over them in an effort to cut weight. Instead of a full vestibule, there’s a 4 inch wide swath of fabric that is sewn on the edge of the roof that acts like a rain gutter, channeling water away from the doors and down the roof of the tent. It works really well for this purpose, although it doesn’t provide any wind protection. More on that in a second.

A narrow strip of fabric runs along the top of the side windows and acts like a rain gutter, channeling water away from the side windows when it rains.
A narrow strip of fabric runs along the top of the side windows and acts like a rain gutter, channeling water away from the side windows when it rains.

If it’s raining when you pitch the tent, you need to be careful to keep the front awning over the front mesh door when the tent is lying flat on the ground. And if it’s raining when you get in and out of the tent (through the side door), you need to put on your rain gear inside the tent and take it off inside, at least if you want to keep your dry clothing dry. The front awning isn’t really functional as a vestibule for getting in and out of the tent and is best thought of as a covered gear storage area, kind of like a car port, but not really a full porch when it’s angled down.

The front awning also helps protect the sides of the tent from being blown flat as long as you pitch the awning facing the wind.  In order to provide better wind protection the fly has been cut a good deal wider than the inner tent body. But the added awning width and the need to anchor the sides of the Tensegrity 1 roof using guy lines stretched at a 90 degree angle to the inner tent, makes this tent very difficult to pitch in forests where you don’t have a big and open flat space to fit it into. If you like the interior space of the Tensegrity 1 but need to pitch it along heavily wooded trails, I recommend you take a look at the Sierra Design Flashlight FL 1, which is quite similar to the Tensegrity 1, but requires far less open space.

The awning and the side guy lines require quite a wide space to pitch and one that's much wider than the inner tent.
The awning and the side guy lines require quite a wide space to pitch and one that’s wider than the inner tent.

Pitching The Tensegrity 1

Before you start pitching the Tensegrity 1, make sure the solid inner doors on the side windows are completely zipped up. This should really be done whenever you break the Tensegrity 1 down, to prevent rain from entering the inner compartment when you pitch it. When pitching in the rain, you also need to make sure that the front awning always covers the mesh front door, since it doesn’t have a solid fabric inner flap.

While the Tensegrity 1 is a trekking pole tent, it comes with a curved hooped tent pole that threads through a sleeve over your feet to create more interior volume, including a small screened window with a covered awning. This window can’t be closed and is necessary to allow wind to flow through the tent and out the back to keep the tent from going airborne when the wind picks up.

The foot area is suspended from an exterior hooped tent pole that you need to carry in addition to trekking poles.
The foot area is suspended from an exterior hooped tent pole that you need to carry in addition to trekking poles.

When pitching the Tensegrity 1, I’ve found it best to insert this rear hoop pole first, before staking it out with the rear corners of the inner tent. After that, lightly stake the front corners of the inner tent body (with lots of slack in the guy lines) before inserting your trekking poles into the grommets at the base of the front wall and the pole sleeves in the front awning.

I set my trekking poles to be 125 – 130 cm long. If the length markings on your poles have worn out from use, be sure to pre-measure the required length before you go on a trip. You must also use conventional trekking poles with vertical handles, since the Tensegrity’s pole handle sleeves are not compatible with PacerPole Grips.

Next, pull up the awning so that the front wall of the Tensegrity inner elevates and stake out the center guy line on the awning. The front wall of the inner tent doesn’t go completely vertical and stays titled back, but will stay up when you stake the center guy line on the awning, since the two are attached.

When you pull the front awning the front wall will lift up.
When you pull the front awning the front wall will lift up.

Tighten the guy line on the front corners of the inner tent – they have line locs on them for easy adjustment – and then stake out the two apex guy lines connected to the top of the front awning near the pole handles, so that they form a 90 degree angle with the inner tent. These take most of the wobble out of the pitch, but not all of it. You can also try repositioning the grommets more widely, although I haven’t found that it makes much a difference in eliminating the wobble factor.

You can change the angle of the trekking poles by moving the grommet to a different location along the front of the tent. It's a great way to loose the grommet strap too.
You can change the angle of the trekking poles by moving the grommet strap to a different location perforated slot along the front of the tent, although doing so doesn’t have a noticeable effect on pitch stability since the poles still lean backwards along the front of the inner tent. It’s a great way to lose the grommet strap too.

Finally stake out the two remaining corners of the awning and walk around the tent, tightening up the line locs and guy lines as much as you can without pulling your stakes out of the ground. I’ve pitched this tent numerous times and never been completely happy with the tightness of the pitch. Despite this, it’s proven weather worthy in heavy thunderstorms, so it’s not about to fall even though there’s still some slack in the fly fabric and walls.

View from interior of tent into the gear storage area under the front awning.
View from interior of tent into the gear storage area under the front awning. This front window opens like a hatch to give you access to the gear under the awning, but is awkward to use as a door with the poles and awning in the way.

Assessment

While the Sierra Designs Tensegrity 1 FL tent incorporates a lot of innovative design concepts, it’s comfortable to sleep in, well-ventilated, and will keep you dry in bad weather, it’s not one of the tents that I’d recommend to someone who wants to lighten their gear weight by buying a 2 pound tent. While the Tensegrity 1 is not difficult to pitch with a little practice, I don’t like the fact that it requires so much space to set up. That makes is virtually unusable on the backpacking trips I take in the eastern United States with dense forests and convoluted ground where there isn’t enough open space to pitch a tent of this size. That’s the type of environment where a small tarp and screened bivy sack are perfect for fitting into the narrow spaces between trees.

The Tensegrity 1 FL needs a large tentsite to accomodate the front awning and side guyouts, which are considerably wider than the inner tent.
The Tensegrity 1 FL needs a large tent site to accommodate the front awning and side guy-outs, which are considerably wider than the inner tent.

The pitch of the Tensegrity is also a lot “wobblier”, if that’s a term, than I prefer, and would be a lot more stable and easier to pitch if the front poles could be positioned vertically at the corners of the fly instead of leaning backward against the front of the inner tent. And while the Tensegrity 1 has proven stable enough to weather heavy rain storms, I strongly prefer shelters that provide a rock solid, drum tight pitch.

Still, if you like what you see in the Tensegrity 1, including the ample ventilation, single wall construction, weight-saving trekking pole pitch, rain gutters, hooped foot area, and easily accessible vestibule storage, but want a tent which is better suited for cramped forested tent sites, I can recommend the Sierra Designs Flashlight 1 FL. The Flashlight 1 has the same wedge-shaped appearance but positions its poles vertically for a much more stable pitch. (see also: Sierra Designs Flashlight 1 Review)

Likes

  • Great ventilation. Perfect for hot weather camping.
  • Lots of interior room.
  • Lightweight, only weighing 33 ounces.

Dislikes

  • Difficult to get a really taught pitch, even with extra guy lines.
  • Tent requires a large set up space making it difficult to find camping spots in forested and mountainous terrain.
  • It’s easy to forget the required rear tent pole.
  • Can’t block air flow through front vestibule door
  • Minimum of 10 stakes required to pitch the tent.
  • Only one side door, not two.

Manufacturer Specs:

  • Capacity: 1
  • Packaged weight: 2 pounds 6 ounces
  • Length: 88″
  • Width: Front – 30″; Rear 26″ (not including awning, which is wider)
  • Interior Area: 17.10 sq ft
  • Vestibule Area: 8 sq ft
  • Seam taped

For complete specifications, visit Sierra Designs

Disclosure: Sierra Designs provided Philip Werner (SectionHiker.com) with a sample Tensegrity 1 FL tent for this review.
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21 comments

  1. Even if this tent has drawbacks its fun to watch Sierra Designs working on lightweight tents. Every few months they seem to have some new refactoring. I hope they get the formula right and produce a hit soon.

    • You can’t really innovate, manufacture tents offshore, and sell wholesale through a retail channel: the product development lag times and capital outlay costs are just to large. You’re better off with a fast fail business model where you can retool in mid-season like the cottage manufacturers. SD should just buy Tarptent and have done with.

  2. I think the price is pretty outrageous for a 2 lb tent. I was under the belief that the FL version was going to come in at about 1.5 lbs. The vestibule design is also…we…kind of dumb for lack of a better term. In blowing rain your gear is wet.

    I can’t in good conscious recommend this shelter over something like Tarptent’s new Protrail that has more room, a covered vestibule, at least as much stability now with the rear pole design, weighs almost half a pound less, and costs only $209!

    Or am I missing something.

    Thanks very much for doing this honest review.

    • I kept thinking about the Protrail while testing this tent….it would be immensely better with a more conventional front triangular front vestibule and vertical poles. Narrower pitch. Lighterweight.

      There is a version of this tent called the Tensegrity Elite, which I think is lighter. It has to be seam sealed though. That must be fun.

  3. I have the tensengrity elite and its great! I did have to seam seal it which wasn’t hard at all. The set up does take a few tries but once you’ve got it down it’s easy. It is very spacious and I love the awning for my gear. It breaths very well with all the vents open. I traded the stakes with carbon fiber ones which overall lightened the load. It’s about 1.5 lbs with everything, small tent pole for the rear and stakes not including the hiking sticks.

  4. Haven’t had sideways rain yet. But you can stake the center of the awning and stake the outer area of the awning inboard to make a dome shape and that should keep rain out the front if you needed to. During a normal downpour I didn’t get any water inside.

  5. A couple of notes on the pitch: Guying-out on each side of the tent isn’t necessary, and would make pitching much more of a headache. The lines are included so that you can pitch the tent with the awning rolled back in mild weather, taking the place of the awning’s guy-out points. (One of the great things about this tent is that you have no long guy-outs to trip over.) You can also remove the stake from the awning’s center guy-out point. The center guy-out is designed to make centering easier during setup, and you can get a tighter, cleaner awning pitch without it. Overall, you can get a better, easier pitch for most weather conditions with three fewer stakes. Set up correctly, this tent doesn’t wobble at all.

    • You’re thinking about a different pair of guy lines. The ones on the sides aren’t optional – that’s why they’re bar-tacked to the tent and can’t be removed. I think you’re confusing them with the additional guylines for holding the front up when the awning is rolled back. Those are not sewn to the tent and are included loose in the package.

      • Not so. You can check SD’s own pitching instructions for confirmation: “STARGAZING SETUP: When the weather is good use the guyline stored in the pocket to replace the panel stakeout. The large panel can be rolled and stowed using the loop and toggle along the ridge of the tent.”

      • Before I finalized this review, I checked in with a friend of mine who works at SD (someone in the know) to ask him about the anomalies, including the wobbling that I was experiencing with the Tensegrity FL 1. He responded by telling me that he ties the side guys to adjacent trees when they’re available to help stabilize the tent. It wobbles, because the trekking poles aren’t set up vertically, and can’t be. Moving the side guy line points forward doesn’t remove the wobble. Unfortunately nothing does, since I tried just about everything imaginable to eliminate it. Wobbling isn’t inherently bad, mind you, as long as your tent doesn’t blow away. It’s just not my cup of tea.

  6. The extra cords included loose in the package aren’t for holding up the tent with the awning rolled back (the “stargazing” setup SD refers to); that’s exactly what the attached guylines are for. The extra cords are for what SD calls the “open awning setup,” which relies on a second pair of hiking poles to pitch the awning high and flat to create a covered outdoor sitting space.

    Setup instructions: http://www.sierradesigns.com/images/Sierra_Designs_Tensegrity_Pitching_Instructions.pdf

    • I hate to break it to you, but SD provides the same instructions for the 2 person tent as the one person tent even though they make no sense at all. This is common in the outdoor industry, unfortunately, and I find myself having to explain to people how to set up tents often because the instructions are just so bad or omit so much for actual use in any environment except a campground. For example, where would the second pair of trekking poles come from for the 1 person tent. Do you carry two pairs of trekking poles?

  7. I assume you’re not asking seriously about the second set of poles. In their absence, the tarp can be guyed out to trees, or makeshift poles can be fashioned from deadfall. Otherwise, I’m not sure what problem you have with SD’s pitching instructions. I’ve found them to be spot-on, and I think they provide a much better pitch than what you’ve described above, solving a number of the gripes you have about the tent.

    • Don’t you think I read them before I took the tent outside or wrote this review? Do they talk about the wobble in those instructions? Or about pitching the tent on uneven ground (since the awning is so much wider than the tent body)? Or about the size of the pitch area required to set up the tent? None of those things are addressed by the instructions. That’s the value-add that reviewers provide.

      • Let me elaborate on that point. There’s no such thing as a perfect shelter for all conditions, but that is what SD is trying to sell. I try to explain the environmental conditions that make or break a shelter. I provide context. Something that brands, especially brands with a west coast view of the world, seldom do.

      • Amen.

  8. Has anyone ever considered the sag that every lightweight Nylon/Polyester (much on the former) has? ’cause I don’t know any lightweight waterproof fabric that won’t sag when wet.
    To me this tent looks an interesting option for the cycle tourer, as you can keep your bicycle protected from the rain. Still, there’s no vestibule to keep you covered when cooking outside

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