22 responses

  1. Kevin O
    July 29, 2013

    I love the article and this is something I’d consider getting into. I generally don’t carry a stove, but I’m considering doing a long section of trail to finish Mass and start VT (Long section for me). For that trip, a wood stove w/ an esbit backup sounds… Even if just for the sake of Coffee!

  2. Jason
    July 29, 2013

    Thanks, great article. I’ve been thinking of making a wood stove just for fun. It will probably make my pack slightly heavier, but there is something cheery about burning wood that I miss when I’m solo hiking and don’t build a fire.

    • Philip Werner
      July 29, 2013

      Exactly! Very comforting and uplifting.

      • Jason
        August 14, 2013

        This article inspired me to finally build my own wood stove, similar to this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxODae_BS74. The only modification I made was to make the pot stand from a crab meat can with two rows of 3/8th inch holes drilled around it. Performance was outstanding with wood and with esbit. This will be my go-to stove from now on!

  3. Jason
    July 29, 2013

    An interesting survey might be to ask what people do in camp at night when they’re solo hiking. When I’m hiking with friends, they always want to build a fire at night. When I’m on my own, I get bored in camp, so I just fiddle with my shelter a bit and then go to sleep early. I often wonder what others do.

    • Philip Werner
      July 29, 2013

      Good idea. I look forward to going to sleep early – I sleep better on solo backpacking trips than any other time, often for 10-12 hours a night. Pure bliss.

  4. Ben
    July 29, 2013

    I have the Bush Buddy. I find that the alcohol burner from the caldera cone works great in the bush budyy (and I’m assuming the solo stove since they look identical) if you prop it up about 3/4 of an inch so the distance between the burner and the pot is about what it is in the cone. I just use circular piece of foil for this. The burner will fit in the bush buddy for storage and with a windscreen I get excellent performance. The burner itself is so light it is hardly any weight penalty. I like to use wood in the evening and then use the alcohol in the morning to save time.

    • Philip Werner
      July 29, 2013

      I do the same thing with esbit – slightly faster than cooking with wood in the morning.

  5. Albert
    July 29, 2013

    Philip – Love the pic. I dream of Jeannie? What did you wish for?
    :-)

    • Philip Werner
      July 29, 2013

      Glad you like my eye, Al. Framed signed copies are available for sale! LOL.

      • Joe
        July 30, 2013

        I just bought the Solo Titan because of you. Argh, you end up costing me so much money!

      • Grandpa
        July 30, 2013

        Philip’s cost me a lot of money, too. For that matter, some of it’s even gone to him! I’ve got his old tarp and Black Diamond light, both of which made a trip back to the Whites this summer with me while he was in Texas near where I live. I consider the return on investment to be of high elevation, perhaps even above tree line.

  6. Walter Underwood
    July 30, 2013

    I have not yet had a chance to fire mine up in the woods, but I was impressed with the heat output when I tried it on our patio. Pluses, you can take it on an airplane. Minuses, probably not OK during our “no wood fire” periods in California.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152894081695437&set=pb.500260436.-2207520000.1375223590.

  7. Tim Moon
    July 30, 2013

    That seems a little pricey for a rather simple stove. But it sounds like it works great so maybe it’s worth it. I like that it’s a double wall design. Great review.

  8. Silkyman
    July 31, 2013

    Had a wood-burning stove once, but down here in the deep south most of the dry wood is from coniferous trees with lots of resin; hence, lots of gunk left on your pot … didn’t like that and still don’t. I don’t usually build a fire of any kind in the summer; in winter, I like a fire if it makes sense. These days I use an alcohol stove (WhiteBox or TrailDesigns’ beer can) and Caldera Cone to cook on, with Esbit for backup. I don’t build fires unless I happen upon a fire ring and I have time. Some people cannot live without building a fire … I used to be that way, but got over it … I’ll admit though, there is something in our genetic makeup that makes staring at a fire a spiritual event.

  9. PaulA
    August 2, 2013

    I love my Ti Honey Stove (http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/wood-burning-stoves/RD106.html). Packs flat, weighs around 4oz (when the SS grill is left at home), it can burn Esbits pretty efficiently and function as a windscreen for an alcohol stove. Not cheap though!

  10. Nick
    August 5, 2013

    Has anyone tried using charcoal briquettes in such a stove?

    • Grandpa
      August 5, 2013

      I have a Sierra Zip stove and charcoal briquettes are an awesome fuel. My brother also has one and uses briquettes when car camping. He’ll set the stove up in the vestibule of his tent and a couple briquettes will last all night and keep the tent quite a bit warmer than the outside. The Zip is a different stove but I’d think the concept would work.

  11. Joe
    August 8, 2013

    Ok, on your recommendation (and Amazon reviews), I did my investigation, and then bought the Titan version of this stove.

    It is AWESOME.

    Sat on the banks of the Kancamagus at Otter Rock yesterday. Made a little hole in the wet sand, built a fire with dry sticks (pine cones smoke) and roasted some hot dogs and made some s’mores with the gf. We had a frickin blast. Stove works better than described. This is a miracle machine.

    Pros:
    Does everything you need. Sticks, make fire. Clean up is a cinch.

    Cons:
    Not cons, but considerations: needs a camp grill to cover it if you want to do cooking, which we didn’t have, so we were depending on the stability of the stove, which wasn’t insanely high.
    Get your dry woods first. Make a pile.

    This thing totally made the trip. You can have self-contained fires wherever you want. Totally changes everything.

    • Philip Werner
      August 8, 2013

      Fantastic! Exactly, Gather your wood first. It doesn’t take much, and go. And you do need a grill and probably the larger sized stove if you plan to cook meat/fish.

      • Walter Underwood
        August 8, 2013

        If you pick up a little wood along the trail, you can avoid stripping the campsite area. Because the stove is so efficient, you don’t need to carry armloads, just a handful small sticks you can break up at camp.

  12. Art Wray
    July 31, 2014

    A great option and a simple, sturdy well made piece of gear .

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