The Honey Stove: Not Just a Wood Stove

Here's a nifty new ultralight wood stove stove that I found on London Backpacker's blog over the weekend that is manufactured and sold by backpackinglight.co.uk, (which has no affiliation with backpackinglight.com.) I recommend that you visit their site. They have some cool gear that is not available in the US and their site has a lot of useful information packed into it (and doesn't require a annual subscription to access).

First off, the Honey Stove not just an ultralight wood stove like the Bushbuddy, which appeals to my multi-function ultralight packing strategy. But the extra functionality has a price because the Honey Stove weighs 12.5 oz, which more than twice the weight of the 5.1 oz. Bushbuddy. Hopefully future versions will cut the weight down some.

Despite this, I find the Honey Stove appealing because it can fit any pot size and because the stove walls can be used as a windscreen and stove shelf for other fuel types such as Esbit and alcohol (meths) stoves.This is an important because, depending on your risk and comfort tolerances, you may want to carry an alternate stove/fuel source as a fall back in case dry wood is unavailable. In fall back mode, the Honey Stove can act as a wind screen and base plate, saving you an extra ounce or two.

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5 Responses to The Honey Stove: Not Just a Wood Stove

  1. ChaiG December 11, 2008 at 10:18 am #

    I've got to think that the honeystove would be faster/hotter/better than the bushbuddy because the honeystove appears to have very little of the flame exposed, while the bushbuddy appears more prone to heat loss. I'd love to see a side by side comparisson on these two stoves.

    As it looks right now though, I'd go with the honeystove even with the additonal weight.

  2. Earlylite December 11, 2008 at 10:32 am #

    There's another European stove you should look at called the Bush Cooker. Here's another You Tube video for it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBWLlgJD2Ec

    I haven't done any kind of analysis but it looks like the Bush Cooker has better wood gasification properties than the Honey Stove. I haven't actually played with a Bush Buddy, but a comparison of the two would also be great.

  3. Timmy Mac December 15, 2008 at 5:19 pm #

    Both the honey stove and the bush cooker are really interesting, though I agree the bush cooker looks a little more efficient. I also don't know that I'd want to assemble a honey stuff when I'm cold, tired and hungry. I don't have really good fine motor skills under normal circumstances.

    What's the general consensus on how these wood burning stoves jibe with LNT philosophy?

  4. Earlylite December 15, 2008 at 5:45 pm #

    Not sure I can answer that. The bigger issue is whether you are "allowed" to burn wood where you are backpacking. I met a guy two weekends ago who carries a hatchet with him wherever he goes (in his backpack). His philosophy was that it's ok wherever you are as long as you don't get caught.

  5. Mike May 17, 2010 at 8:47 am #

    Another point that you missed out is that the honey stove has slits on the side panels. These are cut to fit a civilian trangia burner and therefore only need 4 pieces…

    http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4048/4507588121_af

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