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Kovea EZ Eco Refillable Gas Canister Stove Review by Hikin’ Jim

The Kovea EZ Eco (KGB-1410) version of the Alpine Pot from Kovea.
The Kovea EZ Eco (KGB-1410) version of the Alpine Pot from Kovea.

Kovea EZ Eco Stove

Fuel Efficiency
Weight
Simmering Ability
Time to Boil
Ease of Use

Excellent

The Kovea EZ Eco Stove is a refillable canister stove system that helps eliminate wasted canister fuel and trash. Stable and safe for kids to use, it can be used to simmer or boil water to make backpacking and camping meals, while providing significant savings on lifetime fuel costs.

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This is a follow up review to my original review of the Kovea EZ Eco, which I published last year on SectionHiker.com (click for previous review).  In that review, I found many things that I liked about the stove but ultimately could not recommend it because it appeared to be having problems with the regulatory mechanism that controls the flow of gas. Kovea contacted me, and about a year later, I got a re-worked version of the stove, which is now available from REI.

This review is of the “domestic” version of the stove.  Since it’s made in Korea, that means the Korean version.  The version of the stove now for sale in the US has some cosmetic differences (and the instructions are in English), but the internals are the same.  It looks like they switched vendors on the pot; the pot now on sale in the US is a little different from the one I received for this review (Kovea makes the stove but contracts out the pot), but again those differences are cosmetic.

A Canisterless Canister Stove

The EZ Eco is the “canisterless” version of the Kovea Alpine Pot.  The Alpine Pot is Kovea’s take on a Jetboil type stove.

The "what's in the box" photo of the EZ Eco. Included:  Pot, stuff sack, lid burner, heat exchanger cover (lower, at far right)
The “what’s in the box” photo of the EZ Eco.
Included:  Pot, stuff sack, lid burner, heat exchanger cover (lower, at far right)

What do I mean by “canisterless?”  Well, if you look at the first photo in this review, you’ll see the stove fully set up – but you don’t see a canister.  The stove runs off of an internal tank that one fills before one leaves on a trip.

How to Fill

On the bottom of the stove is a brass fuel port under a rubber cover.

The brass fuel port on a Kovea EZ Eco Note the markings are in Korean on this stove. The version sold in the US is marked in English.
The brass fuel port on a Kovea EZ Eco. Note the markings are in Korean on this stove. The version sold in the US is marked in English.

One can either fill from a normal threaded backpacking type gas canister via an adapter – or one can fill directly from a restaurant type 100% butane canister, the type used in the restaurant and hospitality industry.

Filling directly from a "restaurant" type 100% butane canister
Filling directly from a “restaurant” type 100% butane canister

To fill from a “restaurant” type 100% butane canister, one simply removes the cap from the butane canister, places the built-in nozzle of the canister into the fuel port on the stove, and pushes down.  The gas starts immediately flowing into the tank.  If you’ve ever filled a refillable butane lighter (like the kind used for cigarettes etc.), you already know how to fill an EZ Eco.  Fill until the fuel level in the “window” is level with the “MAX” line.  The EZ Eco has a relief valve, making it nearly impossible to overfill.

The fuel window on an EZ Eco stove (just left of fill markings labeled "MAX"). Hold the stove up to the light, and you can easily see how much fuel you have.
The fuel window on an EZ Eco stove (just left of fill markings labeled “MAX”). Hold the stove up to the light, and you can easily see how much fuel you have.

Why use “Restaurant” type canisters?

Why might one want to fill using restaurant type canisters?  Well, they’re cheap.  Really cheap.  In the US, I’ve seen them for as low as $1.25 each if one buys a four-pack.  Even if they were double that price, they’d still be cheap.  Restaurant type canisters come in “8 ounce” size (about 227 g).  An equivalent sized backpacking type gas canister runs about $6.00 – roughly triple the price of restaurant type gas canisters.

The Downside of Restaurant type canisters

The down side of course is that restaurant type canisters contain just “plain” butane (i.e. n-butane).  N-butane is a lousy fuel in cold weather.  Now, for a summer hiker, that may matter not at all, but if you’re going to go out in temperatures that are heading toward about 50 F/10 C or lower, you definitely don’t want to bring n-butane as your fuel.  Butane doesn’t vaporize well in colder temperatures (and not at all below freezing) which leaves you no pressure to run your stove on.  Herein lies the advantage of backpacking type canisters.

Why use Backpacking type canisters?

They figured out years ago that n-butane alone wasn’t much good when temperatures start getting toward 50 F/10 C or lower.  So they added propane and in some cases switched from n-butane to isobutane.  A blended fuel of some mix of propane, isobutane, and n-butane maintains good operating pressure down into colder temperatures.  One can typically get good operating pressure at freezing and even below with a blended gas.  Sure, backpacking canisters are more expensive, but n-butane just isn’t going to work in cold weather.

The Downside of Restaurant type canisters The down side of course is that restaurant type canisters contain just "plain" butane (i.e. n-butane).  N-butane is a lousy fuel in cold weather.  Now, for a summer hiker, that may matter not at all, but if you're going to go out in temperatures that are heading toward about 50 F/10 C or lower, you definitely don't want to bring n-butane as your fuel.  Butane doesn't vaporize well in colder temperatures (and not at all below freezing) which leaves you no pressure to run your stove on.  Herein lies the advantage of backpacking type canisters. Why use Backpacking type canisters? They figured out years ago that n-butane alone wasn't much good when temperatures start getting toward 50 F/10 C or lower.  So they added propane and in some cases switched from n-butane to isobutane.  A blended fuel of some mix of propane, isobutane, and n-butane maintains good operating pressure down into colder temperatures.  One can typically get good operating pressure at freezing and even below with a blended gas.  Sure, backpacking canisters are more expensive, but n-butane just isn't going to work in cold weather. The Downside of Backpacking type canisters Well, of course the price, but backpacking canister valves won't fit into the little fuel port on the EZ Eco.  Not a huge deal, but you need an adapter.
Adapters suitable for filling the tank on an EZ Eco Left:  Brunton “Fuel Tool”.  Right:  Kovea EZ Eco Adapter

You can use the Kovea purpose-built adapter, shown above on the right, that is ideal for filling the tank – or you can use an adapter of the type used to fill regular butane lighters – such as the Brunton “Fuel Tool” shown above on the left.  Screw the adapter onto a typical backpacking canister of gas, and then fill just as you would with a 100% butane restaurant canister.  Since the Kovea adapter comes with the stove, I recommend just using it (hey, it’s free, right?), but if you lose it or are somewhere where gas is available but don’t have the Kovea adapter, you could always use an adapter meant for filling regular butane lighters.

A Kovea fill adapter for the EZ Eco on a backpacking type canister.
A Kovea fill adapter for the EZ Eco on a backpacking type canister.

The Advantages of Canisterless

Well, there’s the obvious advantage of not having to carry a canister, but other advantages include:

  • No half empty canisters.  C’mon.  Everybody knows about it. You get half empty canisters, and then they sit in the closet.  You’re not sure just how much gas is left, so you don’t want to take them out on the trail.  With the EZ Eco, there’s a fuel window, and you can see exactly how much you’ve got before you go.  If you empty one canister, you fill from the next; your stove’s tank always remains topped off.  The amount of fuel in the canisters you draw from is immaterial.
  • No trail trash.  There’s always the temptation to ditch an unneeded canister in a “less than optimal” fashion.  Oh, sure it’s not really littering.  But I’ve seen half full canisters left beside the trail so that the next hiker can use them, but sometimes they just rust and become trash.  Worse, I’ve found them in bushes and under rocks.  Fortunately, this doesn’t happen too often, but removing the canister removes the temptation.
  • Speed, convenience, and durability.  Put the pot on and go.  No threading, no screwing it down all the way.  No worries about cross-threading or stripping the threads.  With no threads to wear out, an EZ Eco should last a lifetime.

FEATURES OF THE STOVE

Heat Exchanger

The heat exchanger  of an EZ Eco
The heat exchanger  of an EZ Eco

Like a Jetboil, the EZ Eco features a heat exchanger.  The heat exchanger consists of a number of aluminum “fins” affixed to the bottom of the pot.  The heat from the burner flows over the fins.  The fins absorb the heat and conduct the heat to the pot and thus to the contents of the pot.  It’s a very efficient way to cook.  Whereas a conventional canister gas stove typically takes 7 or 8 g of fuel to boil 500 ml (approximately 2 cups) of water, a stove set up with a heat exchanger takes something on the order of 5 or 6 g per 500 ml boil.  While on a day hike, perhaps that won’t make a difference, but on longer hikes, that efficiency means you can either carry one canister instead of two or perhaps prevents you from sizing up to the next larger canister.  Whether your trying to save weight or bulk or both, a heat exchanger pot set up can be the way to go.

Controls

The controls of the EZ Eco.
The controls of the EZ Eco.

The controls are interesting.  Instead of a valve that rotates around an axis, the EZ Eco has a lever that one moves back and forth.  I actually find this method easier than a valve that one has to rotate to open and close.  The stove comes with a piezoelectric ignition which is easily employed by pressing a large green button to the left of the valve control.

It’s EZ – A good stove for young users

Senior Chief Stove Test Engineer Joycie demonstrates how to use the EZ Echo (Seriously, it really is easy)
Senior Chief Stove Test Engineer Joycie demonstrates how to use the EZ Echo
(Seriously, it really is easy)

One advantage of these easy use controls is that younger users have no problem operating them.  They’re very simple.  Combine the ease of use with the lack of need to hook up a canister (of highly flammable gas), and you’ve got a safer stove system for younger users.  I could see a stove like this, with easy controls and no fuel to hook up, being a really good option for Scout troops or families with children.

Lid

The lid of the EZ Eco.
The lid of the EZ Eco.

The lid has a nice stand up tab that stays put when you pop it up.  I like that.  I don’t like fumbling for the tab to lift the lid when I’m trying to add ingredients.  The lid is a reasonably good fit, but I wouldn’t try to turn it upside down while there’s water in the pot.

Update re the lid:  On the final version, the version now for sale in the US, there are two sort of stretchy rubber band things to keep the lid on.  See photo below. I’m all in favor of it.  I hate it if the lid falls off when I’m trying to pour.

The EZ Eco has a rubber band like attachment to help secure the lid. Good idea if you ask me.  I do not like lids that fall off when I pour.
The EZ Eco has a rubber band like attachment to help secure the lid. Good idea if you ask me.  I do not like lids that fall off when I pour.

Note also that they’ve changed the overall color to yellow instead of green on the final version.  Honestly, I think I liked the green better, but this isn’t a fashion contest, now is it?

“Legs” and “Feet”

The stove base comes with legs and feet.  The legs rotate out to give the stove stability when in use or rotate in for packing up.  The burner has a safety:  The fuel won’t flow unless the legs are rotated out and locked into position.

The legs of the stove base rotate outward and lock into position. Note rubber "feet" at the end of each leg.
The legs of the stove base rotate out and lock into position. Note rubber “feet” at the end of each leg.

At the tip of the legs is a rubber “foot.”  The rubber is a nice, grippy material that would allow one to operate safely on uneven or sloping surfaces.  I don’t recommend cooking at the angle shown in the below photo, but with these grippy feet, you could do it.

The rubber feet on the stove allow it to be operated on non-level ground.
The rubber feet on the stove allow it to be operated on non-level ground.

Capacity

The pot could hold one liter if you filled it to the brim.  Filling the pot to the brim is of course neither practical nor safe.  NEVER let a pot boil over onto a gas stove.  The boiling hot water could cause a sudden surge in gas pressure that could cause a stove to malfunction.  Let’s see.  Highly flammable gas near a burning flame and you’re going to suddenly boost the pressure way, way up.  Hmm.  That just doesn’t sound like a good idea, now does it?  NEVER let a pot boil over onto a gas stove.

Kovea recommends that the EZ Eco not be filled with more than 0.5 L at a time.
Kovea recommends that the EZ Eco not be filled with more than 0.5 L at a time.

Kovea adds a “MAX SAFE FILL” line at the half liter mark.  I think that’s overly conservative.  A careful person could get along fine with 750 ml in the pot, but note that I said a careful person.  You want to keep your eye on the stove and not leave the stove alone while it is on.

Weight

OK, so how much does this thing weigh? But wait. Remember that there’s no canister. The smallest canisters weigh 100 g/3.5 oz empty. So, for comparison purposes, add 100 g/3.5 oz to any stove you compare the EZ Eco to.

With that in mind, below is a table of weights. The total is 773 g/27.3 oz. Ouch. Even if you deduct 100 g/3.5 oz to make a true comparison (to a stove that you have to take a canister along with), that’s still on the heavy side. But just a couple of painless tweaks drop that down a bit: Leave the little cup and HX cover at home. Those are the obvious things to leave behind. That drops things a few ounces.  The bag is a nice bag, but a plastic grocery store bag will keep things together nearly as well. Drop the cup, bag, and HX cover, also deduct 100 g/3.5 oz for the canister that you don’t have to carry, and you’ve dropped to 561 g/19.8 oz, a far more tolerable weight. You could also leave the lid behind and just carry some double folded aluminum foil, but that’s a bit too much hassle for me.

ItemGramsOzTake/LeaveGramsOz
HX Cover220.8Leave00.0
Lid401.4Take401.4
Bag411.4Leave00.0
Cup491.7Leave00.0
Pot2468.7Take2468.7
Burner37513.2Take37513.2
TOTAL77327.3Trail Weight66123.3

When comparing to other stoves, deduct 100 g/3.5 ounces for the canister you don’t have to carry.

Note: The above weights were measured by me on my scale at home in grams. Weights stated in ounces are based on a conversion factor of 28.349523125. Rounding errors may occur. If any apparent conflict in weights exists, weights measured in grams should be considered the more reliable. The above weights may vary from the manufacturers stated weights, but in this case, the manufacturer’s stated weight of 770 g/27.2 oz is reasonably close to my 773 g/27.3 oz.

Cooking Ability

Nice, fluffy noodles made on an EZ Eco. No burning, no sticking.
Nice, fluffy noodles made on an EZ Eco. No burning, no sticking.

Well, you generally don’t buy an integrated canister stove to make gourmet meals.  Integrated canister stoves like the EZ Eco are more associated with fast boil times and efficiency than cooking ability.  However, I found that I could do more than just boil water.  I found that I had good flame control and that I could simmer if I wanted to, without the stove unpredictably blowing out.  That’s more than can be said for some other integrated canister stoves.

Fuel Capacity – Is it practical?

The maximum amount of fuel that one can put into the tank is 27 g.  The smallest backpacking canisters ever sold in the US were 50 g (for the old Rando 360 stove).  The smallest backpacking canister sold today in the US is 100 g (Jetboil brand).  A max of 27 g sounds a bit small.  Now, the EZ Eco takes about 5 or 6 g per 500 ml (2 cups) boil, so that’s a total of about 5 boils per tank.  Kovea claims that there’s enough gas for 6 boils per tank, but that’s under ideal conditions.  I think 5 is a much more realistic estimate, and if it’s really windy, 4.  Maybe it’s 6, but for the purposes of this article, let us assume 5 boils of 500 ml of water per full internal tank of gas for the EZ Eco.

Solo weekend trip

Now, for a solo person out for a weekend, that number of boils actually might suffice.  Most backpacking meals take about 500 ml of boiling water to reconstitute.  If a solo person went out Friday night, had a hot supper, had a hot breakfast the following day, had another hot supper in the evening, and finally a hot breakfast on the last day, that’s four boils of about 500 ml each.  Four boils might well be sufficient, and remember you’re going to get about five out of a tank, so you could even throw in a cup of coffee or two.  Most hikers just eat cold lunches on the go, so this is a realistic and workable amount of fuel for a soloist for a weekend.  It’s not generous, but it’s workable if you pay attention to what you’re doing and know the basics of stove fuel economy.

Longer trips, trips with a partner or group
OK, for a soloist for a weekend, it’s reasonably workable.

But for a longer trip?  No.

For two or more people?  No. Not for a full weekend at least.

Now, for two, it might be OK for a single overnighter (leave Saturday, come back Sunday), but not for a full weekend (leave Friday, come back Sunday).

I would think that the stove really needs at least a fuel capacity of 50 g and preferably 100 g.  A 100 g fuel capacity would last a soloist easily for a week, including “extras” like coffee and tea.  A 27 g fuel capacity simply will not.

Day use/Short overnighters

I think the best use might be day trips or short overnight trips (like a full-weekend solo trip or a single overnighter trip for two).  This is a somewhat limited use for a stove with MSRP of $150 – but see the following two sections before you write it off.

“Hikin’ Jim, you big dummy; the fuel capacity is no problem at all.  90+ percent of my backpacking trips are only for a weekend, and I can just suck it up and carry a canister once in a while for a longer trip.”

Yes, you could do that.  That’s a perfectly manageable work-around.  You do however have to carry the weight and bulk of both the canister and the stove’s tank.  Some people may find this (carrying a canister occasionally) a good way to make this really nice stove system work for them.

The “True” Price

Priced at $150, the MSRP of the Kovea EZ Eco Stove sounds a little high compared to other regulated integrated canister stoves.  For example, a Jetboil MiniMo is typically around $135 to $140, and the MSR Windburner is $140.  However, if you save $4.00 for every 8 ounces (227 g) of fuel you buy, that price differential quickly evaporates.  In other words, the true price of an EZ Eco is actually lower than stoves with a smaller price tag.  Over the life of the stove, the EZ Eco is less expensive than other stoves simply because one can save so much on fuel.

Now, of course, this assumes that 8 ounce butane cans are available in your area for $2.  Sometimes, I’ve seen them for $3 in which case you’d still be buying gas at half off, but your savings would be reduced.  If you do a lot of hiking and camping, you might look into buying a 12 pack of cans.  I’ve seen them for as little as $1.65 each when bought in a 12 pack.  You could always split the pack with friends, members of an outdoors club, or a Scout troop.

Summary – The Kovea EZ Eco

What’s good about it?

  • No canister to hassle with.  Safer for younger hikers since they don’t have to hook up a fuel supply.
  • Efficient
  • Cheap fuel
  • Makes use of half empty canisters (or avoids them altogether in the first place)
  • Good build quality, well executed
  • Easy controls
  • Excellent feet, good stability, good grip
  • No threads to strip, ever.

What’s not so good about it?

  • Limited fuel capacity.  One must still carry a canister on longer trips or with partners or groups.
  • A bit on the heavy side, but deduct 100 g/3.5 oz for the canister you don’t have to carry.
  • Price may be a bit high – but make sure you factor in the cost of fuel before making that determination (you save about $4 for every 8 ounces/227 g of fuel purchased).
  • The little drinking cup is of limited capacity and therefore of limited value.

The Kovea EZ Eco – Highly recommended.

Thanks for joining me on yet another Adventure in Stoving,

HJ

Disclosures: The stove in this review was provided at no cost to me by Kovea with the understanding that I would review the stove as I saw fit, in other words, with no restrictions or preconditions.  I have reviewed the stove accordingly.  Kovea has taken no action to try and sway my opinion in any fashion although I must admit the offer of a lifetime supply of kimchi was mighty tempting.  Mmm.  Good thing they didn’t offer me Korean BBQ or I’d never write another objective review again, ever.  Man!  Is that stuff ever good.

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26 comments

  1. Just a quick comment on my review: It’s nice to see Kovea trying innovative things. I’d like to have seen a greater fuel capacity, but it’s certainly a well executed stove and very workable for short trips.

    HJ

    • great review! kinda surprised it took this long for a company to make one like this? would you prefer this over refilling canisters?

      • Generally, I would prefer this, a tank *designed* for refilling over refilling a “non-refillable” canister. The EZ Eco has a relief valve that makes over filling all but impossible. With non refillable canisters, YOU are the safety mechanism, which may be fine for some but a disaster for others.

        In addition, it’s a *lot* easier to refill the EZ Eco than it is to refill a regular canister.

        My major complaint on the EZ Eco is its limited fuel capacity.

        HJ

    • Jim,

      I’m curious about the durability of the plastic buttons, valve switch, and feet. If the valve lever or one of those feet broke, would you still be able to use the stove?

      • Joe,

        It would kind of depend on the nature of the break. If one of the legs broke but you could extend what was left of the leg, you’d be fine. You’d just have to prop up the broken leg to level the stove.

        If part of the valve control broke (which I think is unlikely), as long as you could move what was left, say with a stick or pocket knife, you’d be fine.

        The most likely failure is in the piezoelectric ignition. If it fails, you’d have to use matches, a fire steel, or a lighter — which by the way you should always carry matches, a fire steel, or a lighter for that very reason.

        HJ

  2. There also seems to be a lot that could go wrong. Definitely not for long trips.

    • I’d have to give you a maybe on that one (the idea that a lot could go wrong). It’s not significantly more complex than, say, a Jetboil MiniMo, and it doesn’t have the vulnerability of the threaded connector of a regular canister stove. Cross thread a regular canister stove, and good bye stove.

      HJ

  3. Did you do any boil time testing? I’m not familiar with butane fuel so I’m curious about whether it boils water faster than isobutane. Also, given the stove system construction, I imagine it would be very wind resistant like the MSR Windburner. Nice review, as always!

    • Philip,

      Most canister gas brands contain at least some regular n-butane. Even if the label says “isobutane” on it, there’s usually around 5% n-butane. N-butane and isobutane are just two different molecular configurations of the same carbon and hydrogen atoms. Both have the same chemical formula, C4H10.

      Unless you have some pretty sophisticated test equipment, you won’t notice any difference in boil times UNLESS you are out in colder weather. N-butane sucks in cold weather. It just can’t maintain enough pressure inside the canister to keep your stove running properly. Isobutane has about a 20 Fahrenheit degree cold weather advantage which is why good brands of backpacking canisters use it. They don’t use isobutane because it cooks any differently. They just use it because it works better in cold.

      The disadvantage of isobutane is that it’s more expensive. Butane doesn’t go from its normal form (n-butane) without doing some “work” on it. The process by which the atoms of the n-butane are rearranged into isobutane costs money.

      HJ

    • Philip,

      In answer to your second question:
      The EZ Eco is definitely above average in terms of wind resistance. But is it as good as something like a Windburner? No. It won’t be anywhere as good as a Windburner.

      The difference is what is referred to as “primary air”. Primary air is mixed with the fuel BEFORE the fuel hits the flame. The Windburner works with 100% primary air. All of the air comes in pre-mixed with the fuel before it hits the flame. 0% comes in from the sides.

      With an EZ Eco, the pre-mixed air is only part of what the flame will need for proper combustion. The remaining air that the flame needs has to come in from the sides. If air can come in from the sides, then wind absolutely will impact the flame. That said, the EZ Eco is clearly better than a standard upright canister stove, but it can’t come close to what a Windburner can do, particularly in higher winds.

      HJ

  4. Is it possible to use an adaptor to put a squirt of propane in and then top off with butane to add to the temperature range? Of course, the risk of conflagration could add to the temperature range of your house!

    • Grandpa, if you really want to do that, and please understand that if you put too much propane in the tank, it could cause the tank to rupture, the safest way to do that would be to pre-mix the fuel in an empty 16.4 oz type propane canister. If you screw up the mix, the canister, which can handle 100% propane, will have no problem with a mix. Once you have your mix and you ARE sure you have the proportions right, then you would transfer the contents to the tank of the EZ Eco.

      HJ

      • Definitely not. I have a pretty good idea of what I’m doing, and I will not try experiments with propane. The consequences of getting it wrong are too dire, and it’s not hard at all to make a mistake.

        Propane is far more dangerous than refilling from a backpacking canister with a known blend or from a 100% n-butane canister. NOT RECOMMENDED.

        HJ

      • I meant don’t encourage Grandpa. He’s a pilot, a map addict, and I’m pretty sure he has a machine shop. Need I say more.

      • Lol. Well, he’ll get no encouragement from me. I won’t experiment with propane myself and I encourage no one to experiment with propane.

        A map addict, eh? Grandpa, I don’t suppose you live in Southern California, do you?

        HJ

      • Grandpa lives in North Texas… but he does have maps of Southern California!

  5. I see your point about using part used canisters but this doesn’t really cut down on trash particularly if you use the restaurant canisters, you still end up with an empty canister that has to be disposed of with fuel that has been shipped around the globe from raw resources that came from a similar distance in the other direction.

    • Yes, but it cuts down on trash left on hiking trails when hikers leave their partially used canisters behind without taking them home and disposing of them properly.

      • That’s the backstory behind the development of this stove. South Korea, where this stove is manufactured, has a huge canister trash problem. Kovea developed this stove to help reverse the crisis in their own country. But it’s also perfectly applicable here in the US. Go to any AT shelter and count the partially used canisters left behind for trail maintainers to clean up.

    • Well, Chris, perhaps, but consider:
      1. A lot of people use 110 g sized canisters. I sure use them whenever I can. They pack better and weigh less than larger canisters. Butane comes in canisters that are double that. You’ve cut the number of empty canisters roughly in half by switching to the EZ Eco.
      2. A lot more disposable canisters are out there than are really needed because almost everyone buys a fresh canister before a trip. All those half empty canisters the fuel from which never gets used definitely increases the total number of canisters out there. With the EZ Eco one can use 100% of the gas they buy.

      HJ

  6. I love how detailed this report is, very well written and covers everything one needs to know.

    For people like me, weight is usually the #1 point though it’s very rare for me to bring food on hiking or camping outings, and even then I rarely — once every 5 years — ever cook anything or heat anything. This stove looks like it would be perfect.

    • Detailed? I’ve been accused of being thorough. :)

      We gotta get you some decent trail food Fredric. Fasting for world peace is fine, but otherwise, it’s better to eat.

      HJ

  7. I love my Mini Mo but the half empty canisters are a problem. I am too lazy to refill canisters and just pay the extra price.

    • The good news with the EZ Eco is that it is really easy to refill. It’s much easier to fill the EZ Eco than it is to refill a standard canister.

      HJ

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