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Park Tool PCS-10 Bike Repair Stand Review

You want a very sturdy bike repair stand to repair a heavy fat bike
You want a very sturdy bike repair stand, like the Park Tool PCS-10, to repair a heavy 40 pound fat bike

Park Tool PCS-10 Bike Repair Stand

Stability
Weight Capacity
Secure Clamping
Portability
Ease of Assembly

Excellent

The Park Tool PCS-10 is a heavy duty bike repair stand designed for home use. It features a quick adjust cam-type clamp that allows and 360 degree rotation for easy access to your bike from any direction. The quick-release height adjustment, locking sliding yoke, and foldable base make the stand easy to adjust and store when not in use.

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Don’t worry, I haven’t given up hiking and backpacking. But I have gotten into cycling this year because it’s a fun way to exercise when I can’t get up into the mountains or don’t have time for a hike. One thing led to another and I’ve started to maintain and rebuild my own bikes. It’s surprisingly easy, what with the help of some enthusiast YouTube videos, and a few friends who are happy to give “advice.”

While you don’t need a bike repair stand to perform simple maintenance tasks, they’re a necessity if you want to do anything more complex or you want to stand up straight while you work. When I work on my bikes, I use a steel Park Tool PCS-10 bike repair stand which has a professional grade clamp capable of rotating 360 degrees and is sturdy enough to hold a 40 pound fat bike without collapsing. Before I got the PCS-10, I used an aluminum Bikehand repair stand, but it’s not sturdy enough to hold the weight of a heavy bike and the clamp was much harder to use.

The PCS-10 is sturdy because it *doesn't* have folding legs
The PCS-10 is sturdy because it *doesn’t* have folding legs

The PCS-10 is sturdier because its legs lock into reinforced slots (with a push-button pin) at the base of the stand instead of the hinged collapsible legs you find on a lot of lighter weight aluminum bike repair stands. Since it’s made of steel, it’s quite a rigid and heavier-duty stand good for use in a home shop, although a little less portable because it’s so heavy (25 lbs.) That’s less of a concern for me since I have a fixed space set aside to work on my bikes. It’d be different if I lived in an apartment or had to put my bike tools away every time I worked on a bike.

The PCS-10 can grip any sized tube and rotate it 360 degrees
The PCS-10 can grip any sized tube and rotate it 360 degrees

The PCS-10 also comes with an excellent clamp that’s easy to engage one-handed when you hoist a bike onto it, The clamp has a top and bottom channel built into the grip that lets cables brake and shifter pass through, and rotates a full 36 degrees so you can work on the bike from any angle. I find that I can really put some torque on a bike clamped to the stand, like when I’m taking off pedals: it’s that solid. It’s pretty impressive, especially when I’m working on a heavy fat bike. The PCS-10 is about as close as you can get to a pro bike repair stand but in a model designed for a home mechanic. Highly recommended!

Disclosure: Park tool provided the author with a bike repair stand for this review.

Written 2017.

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3 comments

  1. Love having my own stand. Mine is over 25 years old now and still works as well as the first day I got it.

    One thing to keep in mind, many of today’s bikes do not have very thick tube walls. Clamping some by the top tube can cause damage. This is typically true for aluminum and carbon fiber frames. Instead, I typically try to use the seat post if I’m expecting to do any serious wrenching. For just a quick tune-up, lube, and adjustment, a light clamp on the top tube is fine.

  2. Grandpa just took delivery on a bike repair stand (still in box) because he’s the official bike repair person for his grandkids and their friends. Grandpa’s sick of trying to balance bikes upside down and his back is sick of leaning over to try to work in that position. If the new (cheaper… kind of like Grandpa) rack doesn’t meet his satisfaction, Grandpa will try the PCS-10.

  3. Like Chris, we’ve had an older version of the Park workstand for about 25 years. Makes bike repairs, cleaning, and builds a lot easier and less stressful. The stand will hold a bike stably no matter its orientation; if you want the frame rear-end up to work on a rear derailleur just rotate the clamp and tighten. I like it so much I’ll even haul the workstand from the basement to the back yard to wash bikes.

    Park also make a clamp system for vehicles or other portable installations. We have one built into a rear door on our camper van for cleaning/repairs while traveling. Very handy.

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