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Salomon Toundra Mid WP Winter Hiking Boot Review

The Salomon Toundra Mid WP is a warm winter hiking boot insulated with Aerogel, the same insulation used by NASA to protect its Mars probes.
The Salomon Toundra Mid WP is a warm winter hiking boot insulated with Aerogel, the same insulation used by NASA to protect its Mars probes.

Salomon Toundra Mid WP Winter Hiking Boot

Foot Protecton
Traction
Sensitivity
Warmth
Water Resistence
Sizing
Weight
Durability

Excellent

The Salomon Toundra Mid WP winter hiking boot is a lightweight boot that is perfect for hiking and snowshoeing in winter weather. Rated for -40 F, the Toundra Mid WP is insulated with Aerogel, an ultralight foam insulation that NASA developed to protect the Mars probes from extreme cold.

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The Salomon Toundra Mid WP winter hiking boot is a lightweight boot that is perfect for hiking and snowshoeing in winter weather. Rated for -40 F, the Toundra Mid WP is insulated with Aerogel, an ultralight foam insulation that NASA developed to protect the Mars probes from extreme cold. Considered the most efficient insulation available today (3 inches has an R-value of 30), Aerogel insulation is far less bulky than Thinsulate (widely used in winter boots) and doesn’t rely on thickness or loft, making it ideal for cold weather footwear and apparel applications.

The Aerogel insulation used in the Toundra Mid WP boots has the added benefit of being very lightweight, which is important when winter hiking with heavy crampons or snowshoes. Weighing just 1 pound 7 ounces (per boot), the Toundra Mid WP boots are so light that they feel like you’re wearing trail runners instead of a much winter boot, providing a noticeable reduction in the amount of fatigue experienced when hiking steeply uphill or breaking trail in snowshoes.

The Toundra boots are indeed quite warm when worn for cold weather hiking and snowshoeing, with a faux fur lining around the top of the boot for increased comfort. They fit slightly wide and about 1/2 size small, so size up and wear a slightly heavier sock to get a good fit. Your feet will also stay warmer and be more comfortable if you leave a little wiggle room for your toes, but that is true with any winter boot.

Rear heel notch is sized to hold a snowshoe strap.
Rear heel notch is sized to hold a snowshoe strap.

The waterproofing on the boots is very good and I have not experienced any leakage when snowshoeing or stomping through winter streams.  A gusseted tongue also provides extra protection against water ingress, providing 5 inches of clearance in standing water.

Additional features include a thick toe cap for additional toe protection and a heel notch on the back of the boot to hold your rear snowshoe strap, a great add-on to ensure a secure boot-to-snowshoe connection.

The Salomon Toundra Mid WP boot has low profile lugs to save weight.
The Salomon Toundra Mid WP boot has low profile lugs to save weight.

Sole traction is good even though the lugs of the boot aren’t exceptionally deep. The soles are not stiff, so you’ll definitely want to use a crampon with a flexible leaf spring like the CAMP Stalker Universal Crampon, which fits these boots very well.

I bought these winter boots on the recommendation of a peakbagging friend, who crowed about their waterproofness and lightweight. He was spot on with that advice and these Salomon Toundra Mid WP boots have become my winter hiking footwear of choice.

Double 1++ recommended!

Disclosure: The author bought these boots with his own funds and loves them! 

Updated 2019.

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7 comments

  1. Hard to say. You’ll need to experiment with different sock thicknesses.

  2. Do these size comparably to other salomon boots/shoes? Curious if I should order the same size as my XA Pros.

      • It’s always helpful to read your objective and real-world-experience-based reviews, Philip.

        I am shopping for boots for overnight winter hiking in the Whites – mainly 4,000 footers building up to a Presi Traverse. I am trying to decide between the Oboz Bridger, Salomon X Ultra Winter CS Waterproof 2, and the Salomon Toundra Mid WP.

        One thing I like about the first two is they are a bit lighter. They also feature a gaiter hook. The lack of a hook on the Toundra seems like a major oversight for a snow-oriented boot, but it’s not a deal breaker for me, since I can hike with my gaiter hooked on my laces.

        Do you have any thoughts on these other two boots compared to the Toundra?

        Thanks, and happy hiking this winter!

      • I’d think long and hard about how you’re going to prevent your boots from freezing on an overnight in the whites. The traditional technique to avoid this is to buy double boots with removable liners that you can sleep with. Your feet are going to perspire and your boots will freeze unless you know how to avoid letting that happen.

        I’ve switched from the Toundra to the Oboz Bridger. Did it late last winter. My old Toundras fell apart after several years of wear. Both are excellent boots. The Oboz have more rocker and a real insole. But it’d be hard to choose between them as to which is the best. The Oboz are available in wides and much more available though.

  3. Thanks so much for the quick reply and posing good questions for me to consider.
    Last winter, I started using Exped VBL socks. Hiking in VBL socks was not an entirely pleasant feeling, but I got used to it, and I did find my feet stayed warm and my Keen Revel III’s stayed dry. I just need to find a way to prevent the VBL socks from sliding down into my boots and bunching up. The VBL socks from RAB seem to have an elastic ankle band, which I assume addresses this issue, but the Expeds don’t have that feature. I plan to keep wearing VBL socks, though, so I don’t feel a double boot is necessary for me to keep warm and dry.
    Good to know you have found the Bridger to be a solid alternative to the Toundra. I will take a close look at both. Did you opt for the 8 inch or 10 inch version of the Bridger?
    Also, do you find the Bridger takes a flexible crampon well? I have the Petzl Leopard FL’s. I love the light weight and grip. Unfortunately, they just would not stay on the Keen Revels for more than ten minutes. They stayed on my Garmont Ushuaya’s perfectly, so I know it’s not the Leopards. And I think I adjusted them correctly for the Revels. They just don’t accommodate all shoe shapes.

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