10 Best Down Jackets for Hiking and Backpacking

10 Best Down Jackets for Hiking and Backpacking

A down jacket has multiple uses on a hiking or backpacking gear list. It can be used as an insulating midlayer on its own or under a shell, as a warm outer jacket when you’re less active in camp or as an adjunct to your sleeping bag/quilt at night. When it comes to hiking or backpacking, some down jackets cater to the needs of hikers more than others in terms of their warmth-to-weight ratio, hood design, durability, and cost. With these factors in mind, here are the best down jackets that we recommend across a variety of price points for any type of hiking and backpacking, from section hiking and thru-hiking to peakbagging and off-the-grid wilderness backpacking. Be sure to check out our feature recommendations below, so you choose the right jacket for your needs.

Make / ModelGenderWeightFill Power
Patagonia Down Sweater HoodieM | F14.8 oz/420g800
Feathered Friends EOS JacketM | F10.8 oz/306g900
Arcteryx Cerium Down HoodieM | F11.8 oz/335g850
REI Magma 850 Down Hoodie 2.0M | F13.75 oz/390g850
Mountain Hardware Ghost Whisperer 2 HoodyM | F8.8 oz/249g800
Outdoor Research Helium Down HoodieM | F15.4 oz/437g800
Montbell Ex Light Down AnorakUnisex7.6 oz/215g900
Rab Microlite Alpine JacketM | F14.6 oz/414g700
Cotopaxi Fuego Hooded Down JacketM | F14 oz/397g800
Decathlon Forclaz Trek 100 Down JacketM | F10.2 oz/289g800
Fjallraven Expedition Pack Down HoodieM | F17.3 oz/490g700

1. Patagonia Down Sweater Hoodie

Patagonia Down Sweater Hoodie
The Patagonia Down Sweater Hoodie is a lightweight down jacket available in both men’s and women’s models. It is lightweight and windproof with a 100% recycled polyester ripstop shell and 800-fill-power goose down. The hood is adjustable (rear-only) so you can shrink its volume to fit your head, with elastic wrist cuffs. It has two zippered side pockets and an internal chest pocket, that’s good to keep your smartphone warm. It stuffs into its chest pocket, making it easy to pack away when not in use. Weighing 14.8 oz (men’s medium), it’s on the heavy side, but is a good choice if sustainability is a priority. A solid choice with useful features. 

Available from:
REI | Patagonia

2. Feathered Friends EOS Jacket

FF EOS 2022
The Feathered Friends Eos Down Jacket is insulated with 900 fill power goose down that’s available in both men’s and women’s models. Updated in 2022, the Eos weighs 10.8 ounces (306g). It features a low profile dual drawstring hood and a zippered chest pocket, in addition to two handwarmer pockets, Lycra wrist cuffs, and elastic hem adjustment. With a Pertex Quantum Shell and sewn-thru construction, it’s lightweight enough to be used as a mid-layer under a shell but also makes a warm outer layer when worn over a fleece or heavier baselayer. The Eos also makes a good adjunct to a quilt or hoodless sleeping bag, if you want more upper body insulation and a draft-free hood. The new hood adjustment improves this already superb jacket. 

Check for the latest price at:
Feathered Friends

3. Arc’teryx Cerium Down Hoodie

The Arc’Teryx Cerium Down Hoodie (formerly named the Cerium LT Hoodie) is a lightweight down jacket available in men’s and women’s models. It’s made with a 15d recycled nylon outer fabric insulated with 850 fill power down and augmented with synthetic insulation in moisture-prone areas such as the cuffs, armpits, and shoulders. The hood is helmet-compatible but it has a rear drawstring volume adjustment while the wrists close with elastic cuffs. Weighing 11.8 ounces, the jacket has an internal chest pocket and two zippered side pockets, with a drawcord-adjustable drop hem helping to seal out drafts. The fit runs slim for layering under a shell. It’s a good choice if you’re worried about midlayer moisture build-up in a down jacket. The degree of synthetic insulation in this jacket is unique. 

Available from:
REI 

3. REI Magma 850 Down Hoodie 2.0

REI Magma 850 2.0 Down Jacket
The REI Magma 850 Down Hoodie 2.0 is an 850 fill-power goose down jacket available in men’s and women’s models that are specifically designed for hikers and backpackers. Weighing 13.75 oz, the goose-down is treated with a water-resistant formula so it repels water and dries fast. The jacket has zippered hand and chest pockets, which are positioned to be compatible with a pack’s hipbelt and shoulder seams that are rolled forward to prevent chafing under pack straps. The shell is a tough Pertex Diamond Fuse abrasion-resistant fabric while body-mapped baffles, providing warmth where it’s needed and reduced bulk where it’s not. The down-filled hood with rear adjustment lets you fine-tune the fit and tightly quilted underarm gussets reduce bulk and improve range of motion if using trekking poles. Elastic wrist cuffs and a hem adjustment are included. The jacket can be stuffed into the left side pocket for easy packing. REI really went to town for hikers with this excellent design!

Check for the latest price at:
REI

4. Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer /2 Hoody

Ghost Whisperer 2 Hooded Down jacket
The Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer /2 Hoody is an ultralight down jacket available for men and women. It’s insulated with 800 fill-power down insulation and has an ultralight 10d recycled ripstop shell fabric with a DWR finish. Weighing 8.8 oz, the first baffle at both cuffs is filled with synthetic insulation to prevent cuffs from wetting out. The hoody has an elastic hood and cuffs with two exterior zippered pockets, an internal drop pocket, and a drawcord hem adjustment. Its highly packable design stuffs into its own hand pocket with an internal carabiner clip loop. If you want an even lighter version of this jacket, check out the Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer UL Hoody, which weighs 6.67 oz and is insulated with 1000 fill-power down.

Available from:
Mountain Hardwear | Backcountry

5. Outdoor Research Helium Down Hoodie

OR Helium Down Hoodie
The Outdoor Research Helium Down Hoodie is a lightweight down jacket available in men’s and women’s models. It is insulated with 800 fill power down with a 15d Pertex Quantum shell. In an interesting twist, the hood and shoulders are made with 30d waterproof Pertex Shield, for added moisture protection. There are five pockets, two drop pockets on the inside, two side zippered pockets, and a zippered chest pocket. The hood has a rear volume adjuster, elastic wrist cuffs, and there is a drawcord hem. While the jacket is a bit on the heavy side at 15.4 oz, we like the extra functionality and storage it offers, which lends itself to cooler temperatures. If you like pockets, this is the jacket for you. 

Available from:
REI | Outdoor Research

6. Montbell Ex Light Down Anorak

Montbell Ex light Down Anorak
The Montbell Ex Light Down Anorak is a unisex ultralight down pullover insulated with 900 fill power goose down with a 7-denier ballistic nylon ripstop shell. Weighing just 7.6 oz, it has a fully adjustable 2-way hood with a fully insulated tunnel pocket to keep your hands nice and warm. While this highly compressible garment packs down small, it will keep you toasty warm when worn by itself as an outer layer or layered under a shell. It doesn’t have any zippered pockets but you’ll be amazed by how warm the jacket is. This has been my main warmth layer for the past two years and makes a great adjunct to my sleep system when the weather turns cooler. 

Check for the latest price at:
Montbell

7. Rab Microlight Alpine Jacket

Rab Microlite Alpine jacket
The Rab Microlight Alpine Jacket is a lightweight down jacket available in men’s and women’s models. It is insulated with 700 fill power down recycled down, treated with Nikwax’s hydrophobic fluorocarbon-free treatment, and comes with a soft 30d Pertex Quantum ripstop shell. Weighing 14.6 oz, it has a 1-way adjustable hood (neck toggles) with a stiffened peak including a shapeable wire brim, two zippered side pockets, and a large zippered chest pocket. The cuffs are elasticized and the jacket has a drawcord hem adjustment. A stuff sack is included. This a great jacket if you hike in cold and windy conditions and want a snug and technical hood with good controls. 

Available from:
REI | Backcountry

8. Cotopaxi Fuego Hooded Down Jacket

Cotopaxi Fuego Down Jacket
The Cotopaxi Fiego Hooded Down Jacket is a lightweight down jacket weighing 14 oz and available in men’s and women’s models. It’s insulated with 800 fill power goose down and has a colorful 20d ripstop nylon shell with numerous color combinations available. Elastic binding around the hood and cuffs seal out the cold, while a drawcord waist protects your waist. The jacket has 2 interior stash pockets, 2 zippered hand pockets, and stuffs into a pocket for transport. Good features and the most amazing color combinations. 

Available from:
REI | Backcountry

9. Decathlon Forclaz Trek 100

Decathlon Trek 100 Puffer
The Decathlon Forclaz Trek 100 is a low-cost lightweight down jacket that’s insulated with 800 fill-power duck down.  Weighing 10.2 oz, it’s available in men’s and women’s models. It has an oversized helmet-compatible hood that lacks any sizing adjustments, two zippered handwarmer pockets, elasticated wrist cuffs, and a shock-cord waist adjustment to seal out drafts from below. There’s no chest pocket for storing a phone but the jacket can be stuffed into its left-hand pocket. Still, it’s a good budget option because it is so inexpensive and made with higher grade fill power down. 

Available from:
Decathlon

10. Fjallraven Expedition Pack Down Hoodie

Fjallraven Expedition Pack Down Jacket 300
The Fjallraven Expedition Pack Down Hoodie is a lightweight down jacket available in both men’s and women’s models. It is lightweight and windproof with a 100% recycled polyester ripstop shell and 700-fill-power goose down with synthetic insulation over the shoulders to insulate when wet or compressed by a backpack’s shoulder straps. The hood is fully adjustable (neck toggles and rear volume control) so you can shrink its volume to fit your head, with elastic wrist cuffs. It has 2 hand pockets and 1 inside chest pocket, all zippered, and stuffs into its chest pocket. Great technical features and more affordable than the Arc’teryx Cerium listed above. 

Available from:
REI | Backcountry

Down Hoodie and Jacket Buying Guide

Down Hoodies, Jackets, Sweaters, Anoraks, and Parkas

Manufacturer product names are very inconsistently applied when it comes to lighter-weight down hoodies and jackets. In general hoodies, sweaters, and anoraks, weigh under one pound. Look for ones with hoods, as they provide the most head and neck insulation. When it comes to jackets, some are lightweight and some are heavier and meant for winter use in harsh conditions. You really have to look at the overall jacket weight to determine which is which. Anything up to or slightly over 16 oz will be good for transitional weather in spring or autumn down to freezing by itself or layered under a shell, while heavier jackets will be more appropriate for winter use. Parkas are almost always intended for very cold winter conditions and are too warm for active use when hiking.

Sewn Thru vs Baffled Construction

With very few exceptions, lightweight down jackets and hoodies have what is called a sewn-through construction rather than a box baffled one, because it is less expensive and labor-intensive to manufacture. With sewn-thru construction, the front and back of the jacket are sewn together creating a pocket that prevents the down insulation from shifting. However, warm air can leak through the needle holds resulting in a slightly cooler jacket. This is not the case with a box baffled design, which is more prevalent on premium down parkas intended for colder temperatures.

Hood Adjustment

The hoods on many lightweight or ultralight down hoodies and jackets are quite rudimentary, with elasticized hood openings that may be too large to prevent cold drafts from entering around your ears. It really depends on the size of your head and the specific jacket. Hoods that are 1-way adjustments have volume controls in the back that let you shrink the size of the hood to provide a better fit. Hoods with 2-way adjustability go one step further and add neck cords that allow you to size the opening to just fit your face and block out any drafts. Two-way adjustability is pretty rare on lightweight down jackets and hoodies but definitely a premium feature worth looking out for.

Down Fill Power

Down fill powers, such as 700, 800, 850, or 900, measure the effectiveness and compressibility of down insulation – the higher the better. Now 900 or 950 fill power down is primo stuff and can really add a lot of cost to a jacket while keeping it very lightweight since it takes less down by weight to keep you warm. You can achieve the same amount of warmth with a lower grade of down like 800 or 850, but it takes more of the stuff to keep you warm and adds a bit of weight to the jacket. However, don’t dismiss 700 fill-power down jackets, especially if they include synthetic insulation in moisture-prone areas. The warmth difference isn’t that significant and while they’ll be a bit heavier they’re ideal in wetting climates.

Down Fill Weight

The fill weight of a down jacket or hoodie measures the amount of down that it has been insulated with by weight. While this can be informative, the actual warmth of a jacket is a function of the amount of insulation it has and its design, which makes it somewhat hard to compare different jackets that are styled differently. Most lightweight jacket manufacturers don’t document the amount of down included in their jackets, which can make it difficult to determine which will be warmer in active use.

Waterproof Down

Some manufacturers use down in their jackets that has been coated with a chemical formulation, called DownTek or Nikwax, to make it more resistant to moisture and so it dries faster when it gets damp or wet. Honestly, the jury is still out on whether these treatments make any difference to the insulation performance of the down. Some manufacturers believe it degrades down’s insulation value and others use it because it’s considered a desirable feature by prospective customers.

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23 comments

  1. While I usually go for the dedicated hiking brands for my hiking gear, I’ve been very happy with the LL Bean ‘ Ultralight 850 down hooded jacket’. Weighs 13 ounces, has 4 ounces of 850 hydrophobic down (I emailed them and they gave me this detail) and is often on sale. Those specs are as good or better than the premium brands except perhaps for Montbell which are always too fragile and pricey for my needs. I’ve used this on winter hikes in the White Mountains and in the Sierra and it’s always stayed dry and kept me warm.

    • I’m very happy with mine also. Comfort, fit, function. 14.4 oz size Medium, 850 FP, Pertex Quantum. Wasn’t sold on the stuff at REI, expensive, and unnatural fit. Got it on sale several years ago. Haven’t looked back, sometimes “Premium” is just a price tag and a name.

  2. I like the addition of the evaluative comments in italics for this ’10 best’ post

    • A last minute inspiration. Glad it helps.

    • I, too, am a fan of that.

    • I agree. It’s useful. I wish there were comments like this for the synthetic jackets which is my preference for the Pacific Northwest.

    • I concur with others on the italic “bottom-line” text. Your 10 best lists are always chock full of helpful information, and the little bit of extra analysis makes this one even more helpful. Thanks for all you do.

    • I miss Goosefeet Gear from this list. I have an outstanding down anorak from them that I would put up against anything sold by an Outdoor Retail company. The cottage companies have custom fit and US production to offer. Buy Patagonia and you put money in Xi Jinping’s hands. They are deeply embedded in China, their pro-environment activism notwithstanding. That matters to me and should to you.

      • It’s not on this list because it’s not listed in their store. Guess they don’t make it anymore. As for cottage company sewing quality, it is really hit or miss. I like non-custom gear I can buy that has a return policy. You usually can’t return bespoke clothing. Also, don’t get fooled into thinking that cottage companies manufacture in the US. Many don’t. They can’t find sewers. For a complete list of so-called cottgae gear companies, see our directory. We maintain it because we love the innovation they provide, but you need to be aware that sometimes, they “miss”. https://sectionhiker.com/cottage-gear-manufacturer-directory/

      • I believe the Patagonia down jacket is sewn in Bangladesh. As a company they try to be up front regarding their supply chain.

  3. I have the Pack Down Hoodie from Fjallraven and I think it’s great. Free repairs if anything goes wrong and it packs up nice and small in its own zippered pocket. One thing I did was to add zipper pulls to the side pockets and main zipper. Makes it easier to manipulate with gloves. I use it only when I stop, as its proper warm. A medium in the Pack Down hoodie fits well under a medium Keb Eco Shell.

    • Didn’t realize they offered free repairs. That is a great perk!

      • Yup, free repairs for life provided you’re the original owner. They’ll even ship back to you for free. Drove to the Boston Seaport District shop, bought a Keb52 pack while I was there, and brought 3 items in that had developed tiny little holes from hiking and rock scrambling, and they didn’t even ask for receipts or proofs of purchase. Offered to pay for shipping back to my house so I wouldn’t have to drive all the way, but they had it covered. It’s a service thats part of their generally high price; it helps keep gear out of the landfill and in your closet and on your person for years. Their larger stores have a full tailor setup in house, pretty cool.

  4. The Decathlon jacket is EU 800 fp which equates roughly to US 850 fp. So the down is of higher quality than US 800 fp down.

  5. For my tall and lanky friends that visit this post, the best I have found is the Eddie Bauer MicroTherm 2.0 as they come in tall sizes. Pertex Quantum 20D windproof outer material, and a hooded option. 800 fill power down, and just over 3 oz. of down fill. Medium tall fits me like a glove at 6’ 4” and 170 pounds, with an athletic fit that helps trap warmth in and provide great movement. Not a warm, cushy camp jacket, but for use on trail it is pretty great.

    I would have purchased a Rab Microlight Alpine, but Rab discontinued the tall (“Xtra Long” or XL) version of the jacket a couple years ago.

    Jackets from a few other companies on this list like Patagonia and Arcteryx didn’t work for me because the medium is too short in the torso and sleeves and the large is too bulky in the torso. I’ve had good success with Arcteryx in other clothing like waffle fleece (Konseal), hardshell (Zeta AR, replaced by Beta Long), and winter parka (Camosun), but not the technical down for some reason.

  6. Regarding: 10 Best Down Jackets for Hiking and Backpacking

    Hi Philip,

    I really enjoyed the informative article though I would have liked to see one of the Western Mtn. ultra-light jackets included.
    Please consider a follow up review of either or both the 40 Below Zone Vapor Barrier Vest and/or the RBH vapor barrier vest. When one wears an internally framed pack there is no place for air/ventilation between one’s clothing and the pack. So, the insulation, especially down garments become soaked. These vests allow one’s insulation to stay dry since no body sweat or vapor can get past the vest into the insulation. It is problematic
    wearing a pack over a lightweight down garment, without one of these vests as the pack presses the insulation
    against the back allowing no ventilation.

    About me: I have tested gear for outdoor magazines since the 1970’s (when Wilderness Camping competed with Backpacker) These reviews and articles helped partially fund a walk across America and a walk fro Mex. to Alaska.

    I really enjoy your reviews.

    Warmest Regards,

    Larry Amkraut

  7. Couple years ago, I got the Eddie Bauer BC Evertherm jacket when on sale. Normally about $450, got for $299. I’ve been happy with it. Very warm, lightweight, and highly waterproof. The flat down sheets are nice, no puffy balloon look, and no cold spots. I like it, surprised it isn’t on the list.

  8. A good lineup and an important Buying Guide. BUT missing is the LL Bean hooded down jacket. It has great LL Bean quality, customer service and DWR treated down.

  9. Bought both the REI and Cotopaxi today. I’m a 5’8″ 180 on a good day and both fit well, pretty similarly.

    The REI has articulated arms like Kuhl does on their pant legs. There are also some smaller baffles in those arm areas where it makes sense. It has the three zippered outside pockets (one chest, two side) and clinches on the waist and back of the head for the hood. The other difference is that there is a slight rise in the front or more accurately, a straight cut in the front that sits slightly higher than the back which slightly arcs down around behind you. A few nice details there. Sharp looking gunmetal Grey color with angling contoured baffles.

    The Cotopaxi has a slightly more trim appearance thru the body and arms. Less rounded looking and more straight. The color stripes are sharp and break up the design along the baffles which are wider than those in the REI. This makes it feel slightly thicker but not as puffy or airy feeling interestingly. There are the same two zippered side pockets but no other external. Instead there is one internal open on the left and one zippered in the same location right in front of it. There are waist clinches but not for the hood. The bottom hem is straight around the body sort of middle of where the REI one sits front to back.

    Both have elastic wrists and measure about the same in the body. REI’s coat feels slightly fuller thru the midsection/belly of the body and just feels slightly lighter. But in reality they’re almost identical in weight.

    Both were on sale at REI. Theor brand was 139. A steal. The Cotopaxi was down to 216 which is 3 bucks below the REI MSRP. I am sticking with the Cotopaxi because 1) it may be a mental thing but it just feels warmer to me and 2) the fit is less rounded or puffy. Had I not tried on the Cotopaxi because it was on sale, I probably would have grabbed the REI without hesitation. It’s a great construction and product at full price.

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