Home / Advanced Backpacking Skills / Backpacking External Attachment Guide: How to Carry Gear On the Outside of a Backpack

Backpacking External Attachment Guide: How to Carry Gear On the Outside of a Backpack

Old school hikers tie all of their gear to the outside of a back frame instead of a backpack!
Old school hikers tie all of their gear to the outside of a back board instead of a backpack!

Many backpackers attach gear to the outside of their backpack because it’s too bulky, they need to carry extra supplies, they want to keep their gear easily accessible, or because it’s wet and they need to keep it separate from their dry clothing. While some techniques for attaching gear to the outside of a backpack are nearly universal, like sandwiching it under compression straps, many are more specialized and rely on features that depend on the specific backpack you own.

Learning how to attach gear to the outside of your pack, like many backpacking skills, is best learned by observing what other people do and adapting it to your needs. That said, it helps to think about the kinds of external attachment capabilities that are possible on different backpacks and figuring out which ones you’ll need before or after you buy a new backpack.

To help you with this process, I’ve compiled the following collection of examples that illustrate the most common techniques for attaching gear to backpacks and the different external attachment systems.

Side compression straps can be used to attach snowshoes. Pack shown: Deuter Guide 45+
Side compression straps can be used to attach snowshoes. Deuter Guide 45+ Backpack

Side Compression Straps

While side compression straps are not universally available on all overnight backpacks, most backpacking and climbing packs designed for weekend or expedition trips have them. While they can be used to compress the volume of a backpack to bring the load closer to your core muscles, most people use them to attach bulky gear like sleeping pads, snowshoes, or cylindrical tent bags to the outside of their packs.

When attaching gear under compression straps, it’s best to balance the load so that you carry an equivalent weight on the left and right sides. You’ll want a least two straps, although some larger packs have three, that can be tightened using a friction cinch.

Some backpacks have reversible side compression straps like the Moutainsmith Mayhem 35 that let you attach snowshoes or sleeping pads to the back of your backpack
Some backpacks have reversible side compression straps that let you attach snowshoes or sleeping pads to the back of your backpack. Mountainsmith Mayhem 35 Backpack

Some backpacks come with reversible side compression straps than can used to attach gear to the back of your pack. This requires that the rear facing ends of the compression straps have clips, instead of being sewn onto the pack, and that there’s a male clip and a female clip on opposite sides so they can mate together. The other nice thing about this kind of compression system is that you can use it without losing the ability to fill side pockets with water bottles.

Granite Gear packs have a unique side compression system where the lower side strap can run under a water bottle, inside the pocket. The pack shown here is a Virga 2.
Granite Gear packs have a unique side compression system where the lower side strap can run under a water bottle, inside the pocket. Granite Gear Virga 2 Backpack

One of the problems with compression strap systems is that they’re clumsy when using a side pocket to hold water bottles because the compression strap has to run outside of the pocket and around the bottle. Granite Gear backpacks have a great pocket design that alleviates this issue. Instead of running the bottom compression strap outside the pocket, they cut small holes in the pocket that let you run the webbing strap underneath the bottle, so you can use the pockets and the compression at the same time.

It's more difficult to attach gear under a single criss-cross style side compressions straps than multiple horizontal ones: Osprey Mutant 38 Backpack
It’s more awkward to attach gear under Z-style style side compression straps than  separate horizontal straps: Osprey Packs Mutant 38 Backpack

Some backpacks also have a Z-style compression strap, which gear manufacturers use to trim the weight of their packs. While it’s reasonably effective for shrinking the volume of your pack, these Z-style straps are awkward to use if you want to strap bulky gear, like snowshoes, to the outside of your backpack. Horizontal compression straps are much easier to use.

Shoulder Strap Keeper Loops and Hardware

Many people like to festoon their shoulder straps with extra pockets for storing a camera, a GPS, a walkie-talkie, water or snack bottles, or even a map case. But many backpacks lack good attachment points on the shoulder harness to do so.

Look for shoulder straps with horizontal keeper cords and clips in order to attach camera pockets or GPS units to the shoulder straps. Gossamer Gear Gorilla.
Look for shoulder straps with horizontal keeper cords and clips in order to attach camera pockets or GPS units to the shoulder straps. Gossamer Gear Gorilla Ultralight Backpack.

When choosing a backpack, look for packs that have horizontal keeper style straps or small daisy chains that you can hang external pockets from. It’s also helpful to have some kind of plastic or metal ring that you can clip heavier gear onto like a GPS on a retractable cord. If you have a pack that doesn’t have these features, Sea-to-Summit and Gear-Aid sell a wide variety of plastic hardware and buckles that you can often use to rig something that suits your needs.

Floating Lids

A floating lid is a top pocket attached to the pack using 4 webbing straps instead of being sewn to the back panel like a hinge. They’re often used in winter to compress bulky objects like sleeping pads, tent bodies, or rope between the top pocket and the top of your pack bag.

Floating lids are used to attach gear between a top pocket and the pack bag. Granite Gear Leopard AC Backpack.
Floating lids are used to attach gear between a top pocket and the pack bag. Granite Gear Leopard AC 58 Backpack.

When carrying very heavy gear, floating lids help you keep it closely aligned with your spine and your strongest core muscles rather than along the sides or back of your pack where it can throw you off-balance. They also provide much needed vertical compression to keep your load compact and balanced.

Top lid and side compression strap attachments. Osprey Packs Kestrel 58 Backpack
Floating Lid. Osprey Packs Kestrel 58 Backpack

Shovel Pockets

Shovel pockets are open pockets sewn onto the back of a pack that you can stuff gear, like snowshoes, crampons, or layers into for easy access. They’re quite similar to backpacks that have stretchy mesh pockets actually, but more rugged when it comes to storing gear that has sharp pointy teeth.

Rear Shovel Pockets are one way to attach snowshoes to a backpack.
Rear Shovel Pockets are one way to attach snowshoes to a backpack. REI Flash Backpack (updated since)
Shovel pockets are good for storing avalanche shovels, crampons, wet gear and extra layers. Kelty Spectra Cloud Backpack.
Shovel pockets are good for storing avalanche shovels, crampons, wet gear and extra layers. Kelty Spectra Cloud Backpack.

Ice Climbing Tool Holders

Most climbing packs have extra tool holders for attaching climbing or walking ice axes to a backpack. These include shaft holders to hold ice axes in place and ice axe loops for securing the pointed end of an axe to the pack in a way that prevents it from spearing you in the thigh if you fall.

Climbing style backpacks, often used in winter, often have special ice axe or crampon pockets that allow you to attach sharply pointed gear on the outside of your backpack. Pack shown - Cold Cold World Chaos
Climbing style backpacks, often used in winter, often have special buckles or bungee cords that hold ice axe shafts in place when attached to the back of your pack. Cold Cold World Choas Backpack,

The shaft holders are made with webbing and buckles or elastic keeper cords. Some packs also have pick protectors which let you secure the tip of the pick, protecting it, you, and your gear!

Hip Belt Gear Loops

Backpacking hip belts have pockets, webbing straps, or gear loops on the exterior side. The latter two are often far more useful as gear attachment points because you can secure anything you want to them.

Gear loops on hip belts make it easy to rack climbing gear: Osprey Packs Mutant 38
Gear loops on hip belts make it easy to rack climbing gear: Osprey Packs Mutant 38

It’s not uncommon to find gear loops on climbing and winter packs because you can rack climbing gear like carabiners and quickdraws to them when you’re not wearing a sit harness. They’re also used to attach insulated water bottle holders to a pack for easy access.

Daisy Chains

Daisy chains are webbing loops sewn to the sides or back of a backpack that let you clip extra gear to your pack using carabiners or webbing straps.

Daisy chains make it easy to attach external gear using a carabiner. Osprey Packs Volt 75 Backpack.
Daisy chains make it easy to attach external gear using a carabiner. Osprey Packs Volt 75 Backpack.

Tie Out Loops

A lot of lightweight gear manufacturers sew small gear loops along on their packs so that backpackers can rig up customer attachment points. While these are functionally equivalent to daisy chains in some ways, they weigh less and it’s easier for manufacturers to add a lot more of them to a backpack: around the perimeter of the back, the sides of the pack, and even on top of the lid.

Some backpacks have tie out loops that let you rig up custom cord systems for attaching gear to the rear of your pack.Pack Shown: Mountain Laurel Designs Newt (I think!)
Some backpacks have tie out loops that let you rig up custom cord systems for attaching gear to the rear of your pack. Mountain Laurel Designs Revelation Backpack.

You can hang almost anything from a backpack using a system like this from solar power chargers to a wet tarp. All you really need is some cord and a few small cord locks, which companies like Gossamer Gear include with their packs for this purpose.

Gossamer Gear Gorilla: External lash points make it possible to easily secure gear to the outside of the Gossamer Gear Gorilla Backpack
Gossamer Gear Gorilla: External lash points make it possible to easily secure gear to the outside of the Gossamer Gear Gorilla Backpack

When attaching clothing and softer items to a pack, it helps to use an elastic style cord to create a rigging system. More static, non-elastic cord is better for hanging heavier gear, like snowshoes on the outside of a pack, because it’s more durable and there’s less chance that it will break.

Rear Loading Straps

Many larger backpacks have rear loops that hang below the bottom of the pack bag for securing sleeping pads, sleeping bags, or tent bodies.

Expedition size packs often come with rear bottom gear straps for attaching sleeping bags or other bulky items. Jansport Carson 90 Backpack
Expedition size packs often come with rear bottom gear straps for attaching sleeping bags or other bulky items. Jansport Carson External Frame Backpack

While gear hanging from them can be nuisance since it can swing into your legs while you walk, they can provide a convenient place to attach very lightweight items like pads or wet tents.

Rear loading straps make a convenient place to carry a wet tent. Paradox Packs 3900.
Rear loading straps make a convenient place to carry a wet tent. Paradox Packs Unaweep 3900.

Conclusion

There are a lot of ways to extend the volume of a backpack so that you can carry a lot more gear when required. While many of these techniques depend on the specific features of your backpack, there is usually a way to MacGyver a custom rigging system provided you’ve seen enough examples of the external attachment systems that other people have rigged up.

Most Popular Searches

  • a small bag usually tied to our side
  • small bag usually tied to our side
  • a small bag usually tied to our side is called

18 comments

    • I carry a black hole. Amazing how much you can fit into it and it’s ultralight because it only exists in a different universe.

      • Some theories hold that a wormhole can connect black holes with another place in spacetime. What goes into the black hole would appear elsewhere. There is a black hole at our house that sucks up inordinate amounts of money followed by backpacking gear appearing out of a delivery truck, which must be a wormhole exit in disguise. It’s the only explanation I can come up with to explain the phenomena. My wife doesn’t buy it, but she’s not really into theoretical physics anyway…

      • Where do you think those missing socks from the dryer go? Hmm?

  1. On the topic of z-straps, have you ever had one (with top pull) that actually worked? I find they bind up and it makes me wonder if MFG actually test their products. Though that mutant does seem to have a pull at both the bottom and top.

    • It really depends on the pack and it’s overall volume. You don’t really even need true compression on a mutant because you’re probably stuffing it full anyway. I think Osprey puts them those z-straps on a lot of smaller volume packs to say that they have compression, but as a check box item, rather than something truly functional. It’s like load lifters on small packs. You don’t really need them, but people won’t buy your product if they’re not there.

  2. i had a set of micro spikes fall off the back of my pack, carabiner failed or didn’t completely latch from the carabiner being gummed up, possible chain broke on the micro spikes i’m going back a number of years and don’t fully recall what exactly happened, added 4 miles to my trip to retrieve them. i came across a section i wouldn’t be able to pass without them. they are always in my pack in winter. if i need to put them on or take them off repeatedly threw out the day they are attached to my sternum strap or shoulder strap so i can visually see that they are there. just a habit i got into from my own experience

  3. I love my Osprey Kestrel for attaching things and even has Pockets on the Hip Belt to store Compass, Camera, knife, Derringer with Snake shot, Swiss Army Classic and other tiny items that I would normally carry in my pockets, but even better than the Osprey is my Kelty 50th anniversary Model External pack which replaced a Jansport Model, and better yet is my Cabela’s Hunting Pack which is designed to carry a Rifle and your game Harvest and gear over a long haul. Finally my Military Pack which has so many Lash points I can carry upwards of 100 pounds if need be, but I don’t..Back in the 80’s I had a Eureka Pack which was called the Chillkoot, A massive Pack. I used it to haul the majority of gear for my family of 4 for one week up the Mountain from Lake Sabrina to Blue Lake in the Eastern Sierra, and anyone who knows that route knows the kind of climb I had.. so that my families packs were a bit on the light side when the kids were under 12 and the wife unused to carrying a big load so they could enjoy the trip…Including the dogs food and bowl…I’ll never forget that. two tents, two stoves etc.etc. But now my pack for a week weighs less than 24 pounds.. I like that..

  4. I made a Mistake..The Chilkoot was actually made by Gander Mountain before they went belly up..It was a 5000 cu.in. load monster, with a full size Daypack accessory Pack on top which acted as the Lid for the lower section of the pack..I carried up two Eureka Timberline Tents, two Sleeping Bags, Two Coleman Backpacking Stoves and a full set of Pot and Pans from 3 quarts down to a cup size…A Coleman Backpacking Lantern, A 4 Liter Aluminium bottle of fuel and 18 pounds of food, plus fishing gear and everything else… If I recall the Pack weighed in at 78 pounds at home, 8 of which was the weight of the pack itself..

    • I’ve made pretty much the same transition you have. I used to haul 60+ pounds in a pack that could carry a Buick. Now, I’ll be 18-30 pounds, depending on length of trip, weather, how much water I have to carry and how much grandkid gear is in the pack. These old bones can no longer handle the abuse I used to subject them to. With the “new and improved” load factor, I now move faster up the same trails than I did when I was a third of my present age.

  5. Thanks a lot for this article. I was puzzled for years about the intended use of all the straps and loops. Sales people don’t know. I have an Osprey Volt 75 and I couldn’t figure out what the “dual daisy chain loops” were put on there for but now I know. It was only a few years ago that I found out that the loop near the bottom was for ice axes, which I don’t carry in the south. Of course you can use them anyway you want but I wanted to know what the designer put them on for. I just wish companies like Osprey would supplement their videos of sunsets with videos of someone packing and adjusting their pack.

  6. Does anyone have any experience with DIY sleeping bag straps? There’s no attachment on my pack that I can use to anchor a set of straps. I’ve checked the manufacturer and they don’t offer such an accessory for this model. It doesn’t have compression straps across the front either. It does have them on the side but stuffing my sleeping pad into that is too bulky and awkward. I’ve tried using the floating lid and while it’s better than the z-strap it’s still not great.

    • Rig up two cord locks and some cord. Thats all there is to it.

      • Thanks for the suggestion. It’s a straightforward and easy idea but I’m not finding any good anchors that would hold a pad sturdy. I am thinking I will try and find a seamstress to attach some webbing for anchors, or straps, directly to the pack.

      • I sewed straps onto my favorite Osprey pack. It works great, just make sure to attach them towards the outside-bottom of the pack, a little further away from your body.

      • Thanks! Did you hand sew and did you use a heavier gauge etc?

  7. I just got an Jack Wolfskin EDS Dynamic Pro 48. Could anyone tell what the silver attachment buckles are for and how I can use them?

    Thank you!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *