Snow Peak Trek 700 Titanium Pot

I’m into freezer bag cooking. It’s fast, it’s easy, you can prepare healthy and hearty meals, and best of all there is no cleanup. So when I cook breakfast or dinner on a backpacking trip all I need to do is to boil water and use it to rehydrate my prepackaged meal.

Snow Peak Trek 700 Titanium Pot

If you’re like me, you need a pot that can hold at least 2 cups or water, has a lid to retain heat, and has handles so that it can also function as a cup. At 4.8 oz., the Snow Peak Trek 700 Titanium Pot is an excellent option that satisfies these criteria. It can hold up to 24 oz. of water, has collapsible handles that fold up for packing, and has a measuring scale stamped into its side. You can see it here in action on top of my canister stove.

If you get one of these pots, you want to make sure that you bring along a bandana or lightweight pack towel for gripping the handles when they’re hot. The pot does cool of rather quickly however, so you just need these to pour your freshly boiled water into your freezer bag and mix it all up. After that, I normally take the left over water and drop in a coffee bag (coffee in a tea bag), steep it for a while and then drink it down, using the pot as a mug. When I finish my coffee, I do a quick rinse with water, dry the pot out using my pack towel, place my canister or alcohol stove inside the pot and pack it away.

Disclosure: The author owns this product and purchased it using their own funds.

SectionHiker.com receives affiliate compensation from retailers that we link to if you make a purchase through them, at no additional cost to you. This helps to keep our content free and pays for our website hosting costs. Thank you for your support.

Most Popular Searches

  • snow peak trek 700 lid weight

11 comments

  1. What ticks me off about this pot is that the lid is stainless steel. For the same cost or less disability on comparable pots it’s titanium.

    • Snow Peak says the lid is titanium. I believe that, as it doesn’t get the sort of oxide film that stainless acquires. I sailed my lid into the back of my gear closet and lost all track of it. I don’t miss it.
      I replaced it with thick aluminum foil from some coffee can, and am MUCH happier.

  2. I’m picking this up very late, but I’d be really interested to know if it’s possible to rehydrate a dried meal actually in this sized pot?

    • Depends on how much water it needs.

      • Well, I guess 250-300ml (just under half the pot’s capacity). I know this mug us hugely popular but is it really only for freezer bag rehydrating. I guess you could do ramen, but I was hoping to add a dried meal or similar to the boiling water and then put the whole pot + contents in a cosy to rehydrate/cook. Think this would work?

      • Try it

  3. Ah,that’s the problem Phil – I’m trying to decide which pot to go for! What do you use these days, out of interest? Any simple solo recommendations?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *