Winter Hiking

Winter Sleeping Bag FAQ

Winter Sleeping Bag FAQ

A winter sleeping bag has a temperature rating of 0 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Remember, 32 degrees Fahrenheit is the temperature where water freezes, so 0 degrees is plenty cold. Winter sleeping bags also tend to have extra features not found in …

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How to Attach Snowshoes to a Backpack

How to Attach Snowshoes to a Backpack

There are many ways to attach snowshoes to a backpack, although some of them are more energy-efficient and comfortable than others. How you go about doing this depends on the characteristics of your backpack and the places where you can attach or …

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How to Stay Hydrated on Winter Hikes

How to stay hydrated on winter hikes

Have you ever wondered why you don’t get thirsty on winter hikes even though your pee turns yellow and it’s clear that you need to drink more? Blame your brain. It’s not wired to recognize the increased amount of water vapor you …

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9 Winter Navigation Hazards

Winter Navigation Hazards

Winter hiking navigation is different than three-season navigation because easy trails can become unsafe from avalanche danger, deep snow, or dangerous weather conditions. When planning winter hiking routes, it’s important to factor these hazards into your route plans and preparation, even if …

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How to Select a Winter Tent Site

Winter Tent Site

If you go backpacking in winter, you need to know how to select a good tent or camping spot. Three season rules do not apply! Picking the right site will definitely increase your level of comfort, but can also protect you from …

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The Winter Sleeping Bag FAQ: Practical Advice for Winter Backpackers

Winter Sleeping Bag FAQ

Winter sleeping bags are expensive. This FAQ provides answers to question about winter sleeping bags that you probably haven't thought about, but that can make or break a purchase. Learn about how winter sleeping bag temperature ratings are different from three season sleeping bags, key feature requirements, and differences in male and female insulation needs.

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